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BBC World Business Report: Episodes

MEPS have voted in favour of a law that prevents Internet Service Providers from paying a premium to have their services delivered more quickly to consumers. The online takeaway service Just Eat makes its share market debut today in London: the service operates in 13 countries and has been valued at ...
Peter Jankovskis from Oakbrook Investments in Chicago reports on a good day for the markets.
We look at the mysterious and controversial world of ultra fast computer trading. Also a pilots' strike has grounded Lufthansa. And we look at a charity trying to help refugees in the Middle East and Africa by getting them to make kaftans.
General Motors' new chief executive, Mary Barra, has faced her first day of questioning by the US Congress in relation to a fault with the ignition switches on some models. Officials claim the fault led to 13 deaths and has caused GM to recall more than two and a half million vehicles. Chris Low from ...
General Motors' new CEO Mary Barra faces Congress over who's to blame for at least 13 deaths. Also in the programme: Russian energy giant Gazprom announces a 40% price increase for Ukrainian customers. And why python farming is the way to go if you want a sustainable supply of hand bags.
As French president Francois Hollande announces Manuel Vall as his new prime minister, we ask what changes can we expect to the sickly French economy. Plus Jim Lebenthal from Lebenthal Asset Management in New York brings us the news from the markets in the US.
A new UN report says impact of climate change will be "severe, pervasive and irreversible". We hear from those already suffering those consequences - Benjamin Fiafor of Farm Radio in Ghana talks about the problems local farmers are facing. Dr Colin Brown is director of engineering at the Institution ...
Doug McIntyre from 24/7 Wall Street brings us Friday's news from Wall Street.
Is exercise the best way to shed the pounds? In the last of our special series on obesity, we ask what governments can do to encourage more physical activity. We hear from the mayor of Oklahoma City, Mick Cornett, who re-engineered the city to put the interests of pedestrians before cars. We go to Brazil ...
Today was a bad day for shares in one of America's biggest banks, Citigroup. We get that story and more of what happened on Wall Street from Robert Brusca at Fact and Opinion Economics.
Can we trust food companies to tackle obesity - or do governments need to do more? We hear both sides of the argument: those who think the industry is doing its bit to help consumers cut calories, and also from those who claim firms are flooding developing countries with high-sugar, high-fat food and ...
We take a break from our focus on obesity to find out what's been happening on Wall Street from Cary Leahy of Decision Economics.
The economic costs of obesity are soaring. We may need some radical change. In the East of England, we look at ways organic farming is changing and speak to organic food enthusiast Peter Melchett, policy director of the Soil Association. We also question whether we need to shorten the supply chain and ...
We get the latest on the financial markets from Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investment in Chicago.
Should we tax food that's bad for us? We hear from our reporter Marie Keyworth about Denmark's fat tax experiment and ask whether such a system could work anywhere else. Sam Rowe of UNESDA represents the European soft drinks industry and gives us her take. She debates with Dr Kelly Brownell, Dean of ...
Chris Low of FTN Financial brings us up to date on Wall Street, as well as his thoughts on obesity in the US.
We examine the cost of obesity and different policies aimed at cutting it down. We hear reports from China and India as well as an interview with Paul Bulcke the CEO of Nestle. We also speak to Dr. Francesco Branca, Director of Nutrition for Health and Development at the World Health Organisation.
Venetians vote to break away from Italy, the US town that only exists on maps and Chris Orndorff brings us the latest news from Wall Street.
Moscow signs Crimea up to the Russian Federation, the West calls it kalashnikov diplomacy and hits back with sanctions. Turkey's prime minister orders a Twitter ban to the annoyance of the country's president. And the former republic of Venice says it wants independence from Italy.
Doug McIntyre from 24/7 Wall Street tells us how Russia's counter sanctions impacted on the market and in South Africa, President Jacob Zuma's publicly-funded improvements to his rural retreat are called "opulence on a grand scale" by a damning report.
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