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Skeptoid: Episodes

Southwestern Costa Rica is home to over 300 carved stone spheres left behind by the country's previous inhabitants. There are some fantastical claims surrounding their origin and purpose, but what can science tell us about their true nature?
Though first defined in the 1850s, the Ideomotor Response, a quirk of physiology, is still misused to bamboozle the credulous with bogus claims.
The Believe it or Not! series of cartoons makes some extraordinary claims. Is there extraordinary evidence to back them up? Let's take a look.
Did aliens visit the ancient Earth and inspire human cultures to build great works? Some people claim that they did. But is there really any reason to hypothesize that ancient astronauts existed?
When mysterious phenomena is reported in a Columbus, Ohio home, paranormal researchers and media collide with skeptical investigators of the true cause.
Brian opens up the mailbag and responds to some interesting questions asked by listeners to recent episodes on cryptozoological topics.
A look at how our memory works and the many things that can go awry with it. Are our brains like hard drives, or more like easily-smudged chalk boards?
The Discovery Channel put out a 'docufiction' suggesting that the gigantic shark C. megalodon might still be alive in our oceans, but what does science have to say on the matter?
Alcatraz Island harbors ruins, restless spirits and many myths. Skeptoid traveled to The Rock to see the sights and bust some ghosts.
The SS Iron Mountain is a famous missing ship, said to have vanished from the middle of the Mississippi River without a trace. Was there a ship called the SS Iron Mountain and did she actually vanish? Skeptoid investigates.
Griffins, considered an absurd mythological beast by us today, were actually humanity's first known attempt to describe an animal based solely on fossils.
In 2000 a group of BFRO researchers found what they claimed to be a full body impression of a Bigfoot. A more probable explanation is that it was made by an elk. Confirmation bias is discussed.
Some say fibromyalgia is a real disease, while others question the diagnosis. Is either side right? Or does the truth lie somewhere in the middle?
Just as being skeptical about medical claims can help us stay well, applying critical thinking skills to the news can help us make informed choices.
On October 30, 1938, Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre panicked millions of Americans with a radio adaptation of The War of the Worlds. Or did they? Let's take a look at what really happened on that Halloween eve in 1938.
Vacuum tubes have been technologically surpassed by solid state, but tube amplifiers still enjoy the loyally of musicians and audiophiles alike.
Ionithermie is a popular spa treatment especially on cruise ships. It promises instant slimming up to eight inches, and the removal of "toxins that cause cellulite." How does it work, and does it live up to its claims? We investigate.
Early on January 5, 2000 in St. Clair County, Illinois, police officers from four different towns chased what has come to be known as the St. Clair Triangle UFO. The incident has had UFOlogists scratching their heads ever since. But what was really in the sky that day?
A group of 7 West Virginians looked for a crashed UFO in the hills and ended up getting the fright of their lives.

Did they really encounter an alien spaceship and its occupant? Or does a more skeptical approach reveal a different tale?
Masaru Emoto believes in 'hado' -- the notion that water somehow entagles with human consciousness and emotion. According to Emoto, water can actually be imbued with good or bad energy. Is there anything behind Emoto's water woo? Skeptoid looks at the claims.
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