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PBS NewsHour: Episodes

Talks to negotiate Iran's nuclear program stalled over the weekend when world powers failed to strike an interim agreement. Gwen Ifill talks to chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner about whether hope for a deal is dead or alive and next goals for Secretary of State John Kerry.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/NewsHourHeadlinesPodcast/~4/uIac9oJdl_A" ...
Talks between Iran, the U.S. and five other world powers failed to yield an interim agreement on Iran's nuclear program in exchange for easing of some sanctions. Margaret Warner reports on how those talks fell short of a deal and the continuing efforts to keep a future agreement alive.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/NewsHourHeadlinesPodcast/~4/QuUD0Ir9WEY" ...
Typhoon Haiyan is the Philippines' fifth natural disaster in a single year, only adding to the relief challenges facing that nation. For insight on why relief efforts appear to be delayed and how Americans can help, Judy Woodruff speaks to Andrew Natsios, former director at the U.S. Agency for International ...
Relief workers are making efforts to deliver life-saving food and water to typhoon survivors, but there are people in cut-off communities who have not been reached. Alex Thompson of Independent Television News reports on the challenges to provide relief to some of the Philippines' most desperate victims.<img ...
In our news wrap Monday, Nasiruddin Haqqani, a senior leader of the militant Haqqani network, was shot and killed by gunmen in Islamabad. Also, Americans across the nation observed Veterans Day by paying tribute to those who served in the military.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/NewsHourHeadlinesPodcast/~4/OFkgufmTK2Q" ...
In some of the Philippines' most devastated regions, survivors of Typhoon Haiyan are returning to flattened communities with no food, water or sanitation, as officials struggle to provide relief. Angus Walker of Independent Television News reports from the city of Tacloban. Lynnette Lim of Save The Children ...
Justin Fox, the executive editor of the Harvard Business Review Group and author of "The Myth of the Rational Market" has studied the Dutch pension system extensively. He discusses what aspects of the system -- mandatory savings, annuitized payments, national pools -- might work in the United States.<img ...
As cities and states across the U.S. grapple with their pension programs, we travel to one country -- The Netherlands -- that seems to have its pension problem solved. Ninety percent of Dutch workers get pensions, and retirees can expect roughly 70% of their working income paid to them for the rest of ...
China is now the world’s second largest economy. So what happens there, naturally, has great implications for the rest of the world. There’s a very important meeting going on now in Beijing involving the top leaders of the ruling Communist Party that is expected to produce major economic reforms.<img ...
Maine employers and consumers say that importing prescriptions from foreign mail-order pharmacies saves them a lot of money -- and legislators passed a law legalizing imports. The drug industry and the state's pharmacists say imports can be dangerous -- supporters say the drugs are identical. Now, a ...
David Albright, a physicist and founder and president of the non-profit Institute for Science and International Security, gives a scientific and foreign policy perspective on the talks in Geneva.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/NewsHourHeadlinesPodcast/~4/CtH7ljDUj2c" height="1" width="1" />
Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss their takes on the week's political news including the gubernatorial races in Virginia and New Jersey, the future of "partisan posture" among changing demographics and Obama's apology over cancelled ...
The new book, "The System: The Glory and Scandal of Big-Time College Football," offers a behind-the-scenes look at some of the costly -- and often unprofitable -- practices behind the sport, including extreme salaries for coaches and treating players like commodities. Jeffrey Brown talks to author Armen ...
Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's top political news, including who's to blame for the launch of the glitchy health care website, how U.S. spying allegations may have damaged trust between the U.S. and its allies and soul-searching ...
Some Hurricane Sandy survivors have begun to study up on "doomsday prepping" in case another environmental disaster hits. City slickers by day, survivalists in the NYC Preppers Network head up to the Catskill Mountains on the weekends, armed with just the basics to practice living off the land. Paul ...
While millions of people use prescription painkillers for relief, their abuse has reached epidemic levels in some places. To combat rising addiction rates, the FDA has a new plan to limit the distribution of pain meds, specifically containing hydrocodone. Hari Sreenivasan gets more from Barry Meier of ...
Revelations that the NSA has collected phone and email data from our European allies has created a "serious and awkward diplomatic problem" for the U.S. Former CIA official Philip Mudd and P.J. Crowley, former assistant secretary of state, join Ray Suarez to discuss the diplomatic ramifications.<img ...
The controversy unleashed by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden began in June when The Guardian newspaper first reported on leaks about U.S. monitoring of phone calls. Since then, information about the NSA's surveillance have threatened trust at home and relationships with U.S. allies abroad. Ray Suarez ...
In our news wrap Friday, the spokesman for the insurance exchange website HealthCare.gov announced most of the tech troubles will be cleared up by the end of November. Also, demolition began at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., where a gunman killed 20 children and six adults last December.<img ...
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande called for a "no spying" agreement with the U.S. after reports that the NSA monitored and collected phone data from their countries. A State Department spokeswoman said the Obama administration is ready to discuss the issue. Kwame ...
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