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Your Health: Episodes

Returning immediately to demanding physical or mental activities after a concussion can be bad for the brain, neuroscientists agree. But what about after symptoms resolve? How much rest is best?
A simple blood test can analyze bits of fetal DNA leaked in the mother's bloodstream. It's less risky than invasive alternatives like amniocentesis, but it doesn't tell as much about fetal health.
The D.C.-based smartphone tool connects people with a ride to the hospital and a team of medical professionals trained in dealing with sexual assault. But students aren't rushing to download the app.
As vessels become more porous, researchers say, they allow toxins in the bloodstream to reach, and damage, delicate brain cells and raise the risk for dementia.
Although the Republican-led House decided not to vote to ban abortions after 20 weeks, 10 states already have such measures and more states are considering them.
The opposable thumb you use to hold a pencil was long thought to be a defining aspect of humans. But an analysis of finger bones suggests stone tool use by pre-humans — perhaps 3 million years ago.
Unexpectedly high levels of the cancer-causing chemical were found in an analysis of the vapor from e-cigarettes, researchers say.
Children who live in cities in the Northeast are much more likely to have asthma. But a wider look finds that poor children in the suburbs are at high risk, too.
Detox diets are a hot trend, but scientists say there's really no evidence that they are necessary or helpful. One strategy that <em>does</em> make sense: Cut back on sugar. We tell you why.
Bariatric surgery works for severely obese patients because it shrinks the size of the stomach. But years later, the stomach starts to expand and some patients regain the weight they lost.
People use wearable gadgets and phone apps to monitor their health — everything from calories consumed to medication taken. But all that data doesn't necessarily translate into better health care.
Jason Comely's fear of rejection was so strong that he'd become completely isolated. So he set out to get himself rejected at least once a day, every day. Funny thing is, it worked.
The vaccine is only about 23 percent effective against the dominant flu strain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's because the strain mutated slightly.
You say banana; this orangutan says ... well, it's hard to tell what she's saying. But the rhythmic, speechlike sounds of the zoo-dwelling ape have started scientists talking.
One of the most important medical advances may also be the simplest: hand-washing. It's the best defense against spreading disease. And its power was discovered long before anyone knew about germs.
Citing reduced risk of HIV and other sexually acquired diseases, the federal agency says health care providers should discuss circumcision with men as well as parents of infants and teen boys.
The lifetime ban on blood from any man who has had sex with men dates to the 1980s, before there was a good test to screen for HIV. Critics say the policy is outmoded and needlessly discriminatory.
Twenty percent of people who fall and break a hip after age 50 die within a year, and women are at greatest risk. But you can reduce the odds of falling. Here's how.
Text messages from your doctor are just the start. Millennials are the next generation of doctors and they're not afraid to say "chillax" in a consultation or check Twitter to find medical research.
Dr. Prabhjot Singh lives and works in Harlem, a neighborhood plagued by chronic disease. He thinks an African model of health care can help — training people in the community to be health educators.
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