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Your Health: Episodes

Scientists have evidence that beats in the brain — in the form of rhythmic electrical pulses — are involved in everything from memory to motion. And music can help when those rhythms go wrong.
Polls show that Sunshine State voters are likely to approve a measure legalizing medical marijuana in November. Businesses are already flocking to the state, eager to set up shop.
Insulin monitors and pumps are getting better, but a person with diabetes will tell you they're far from ideal. Potential solutions include one that delivers two hormones to control blood sugar.
Hospitals across the country are hiring pharmacists to work in their emergency departments. The goal is to try to prevent common errors that can cause injury and death.
Boys are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder than girls, though both sexes are equally affected. Women are increasingly seeking treatment as young adults.
Dustin Jones is visually impaired, but after he got a bioptic telescope he started driving. About 40 states allow severely nearsighted drivers to use this technology on the road.
Benzodiazepines like Xanax and Valium are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S. Patients and addicts often mix them with prescription painkillers — sometimes to deadly effect.
Some of the dangers of overdose associated with mixing benzos and opioids arise from primary care doctors actually prescribing the mix. Sean Mackey, the director of the Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab at Stanford, explains more.
In <em>Missing Microbes</em>, Dr. Martin Blaser argues that the overuse of antibiotics, as well as now-common practices like C-sections, may be messing with gut microbes.
New research finds that people with low levels of vitamin D are more likely to die from cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. Nutrition professor and author Marion Nestle explains.
U.S. teen pregnancies have declined for years, but Latinas still have the highest rate. Health expert Jane Delgado explains, along with teacher and former teen mother Christina Martinez.
What we think about food may change how our bodies respond to it. Sip what you think is a rich milkshake, and your body acts as if you've had a fatty treat, even if it's really a lower-calorie drink.
If you know Ciroc and Patron, you may well be listening to a lot of songs that name-check brand-name alcohol. And if you're a teenager, you may be binge drinking a lot more, researchers say.
Health officials are on edge after outbreaks of measles and whooping cough. Colorado lawmakers want to make it tougher for parents to opt out of immunizing their children. A panel of parents weigh in.
It used to be parents worried that their kids were hanging out with the wrong crowd. Now they need to worry about hanging out with the wrong crowd on Instagram. But do online influences matter?
A new blood test for people in their 70s can detect who will develop Alzheimer's disease. A positive result could help people prepare. But since there's no treatment, will people really want to know?
Removing bacteria and other impurities from water could be done more cheaply thanks to researchers at MIT. They're taking advantage of the way trees move water to filter it.
Children who have irregular bed times are more likely to have behavioral issues than children who have a regular bedtime routine. A survey of 10,00 children showed that irregular bedtimes are linked with difficulties such as hyperactivity, acting out and being emotionally withdrawn. Researchers think ...
More and more people are using sleeping pills, but they can have side effects, including dangerous drowsiness the next morning. Sleep specialists say the best way to get a good night's sleep is to have a sleep routine, including going to bed at the same time each night.
Everybody knows that you're not supposed to smoke while you're pregnant because it's bad for the baby. But nicotine patches often used to help women quit may pose a risk too, researchers say. Other forms of nicotine replacement may do less harm.
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