Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

Your Health: Episodes

Benzodiazepines like Xanax and Valium are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S. Patients and addicts often mix them with prescription painkillers — sometimes to deadly effect.
Some of the dangers of overdose associated with mixing benzos and opioids arise from primary care doctors actually prescribing the mix. Sean Mackey, the director of the Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab at Stanford, explains more.
In <em>Missing Microbes</em>, Dr. Martin Blaser argues that the overuse of antibiotics, as well as now-common practices like C-sections, may be messing with gut microbes.
New research finds that people with low levels of vitamin D are more likely to die from cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. Nutrition professor and author Marion Nestle explains.
U.S. teen pregnancies have declined for years, but Latinas still have the highest rate. Health expert Jane Delgado explains, along with teacher and former teen mother Christina Martinez.
What we think about food may change how our bodies respond to it. Sip what you think is a rich milkshake, and your body acts as if you've had a fatty treat, even if it's really a lower-calorie drink.
If you know Ciroc and Patron, you may well be listening to a lot of songs that name-check brand-name alcohol. And if you're a teenager, you may be binge drinking a lot more, researchers say.
Health officials are on edge after outbreaks of measles and whooping cough. Colorado lawmakers want to make it tougher for parents to opt out of immunizing their children. A panel of parents weigh in.
It used to be parents worried that their kids were hanging out with the wrong crowd. Now they need to worry about hanging out with the wrong crowd on Instagram. But do online influences matter?
A new blood test for people in their 70s can detect who will develop Alzheimer's disease. A positive result could help people prepare. But since there's no treatment, will people really want to know?
Removing bacteria and other impurities from water could be done more cheaply thanks to researchers at MIT. They're taking advantage of the way trees move water to filter it.
Children who have irregular bed times are more likely to have behavioral issues than children who have a regular bedtime routine. A survey of 10,00 children showed that irregular bedtimes are linked with difficulties such as hyperactivity, acting out and being emotionally withdrawn. Researchers think ...
More and more people are using sleeping pills, but they can have side effects, including dangerous drowsiness the next morning. Sleep specialists say the best way to get a good night's sleep is to have a sleep routine, including going to bed at the same time each night.
Everybody knows that you're not supposed to smoke while you're pregnant because it's bad for the baby. But nicotine patches often used to help women quit may pose a risk too, researchers say. Other forms of nicotine replacement may do less harm.
In a study published in <em>The New England Journal of Medicine</em>, researchers reported an association between daily nut consumption and a reduction in the risk of dying from cancer, heart disease, and other major chronic diseases. Lead author Charles Fuchs discusses these findings.
Updated just last week by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, the new guidelines are based on old data, some heart doctors say, and may overestimate the real risk of heart attack and stroke. That could result in overtreatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.
Anxious mice calm down when they get an infusion of gut microbes from mellow mice. That has scientists wondering if gut microbes play a role in the human brain, too. Research on that is only just beginning. But it's intriguing to think there could be a real truth to the phrase "gut feelings."
Now that enrollment has opened for coverage under the Affordable Care Act, one of the biggest questions people have is, what's the deadline? It's Dec. 15 if you want coverage to start on Jan. 1. But open enrollment actually runs through March 2014. After that, you'll generally have to wait until next fall.
Glucosamine and chondroitin have been popular supplements for arthritis for years. But clinical trials in humans haven't shown that they're any better than sugar pills at reducing pain. Some doctors say that if placebos or supplements help people exercise and lose weight, then that's OK.
Reading literary fiction improves people's ability to recognize other people's mental states, while popular fiction and nonfiction do not, a study says. That may be because literary fiction tends to focus on the psychology and inner lives of the characters.
Please wait...