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Your Health: Episodes

Jennifer Doudna used to worry that her science wasn't doing anything important. Then some basic research led her team to a discovery that could one day be crucial in healing some genetic diseases.
Researchers have found a way to mass- produce the pancreatic cells that are insulin factories inside the body. The findings could eventually lead to treatments that would transform diabetes care.
Liz Paul has struggled with her weight for years. A diet group helps, but it only meets once a week. So she has turned to social media for daily feedback and support. Studies find it can help.
People who have lost significant weight are uneasy about revealing that in online dating profiles, because obesity is often judged as a moral failing. Research shows they have good reason to worry.
Modern medicine offers no easy way to spot Ebola early. The key to preventing an outbreak is still old-fashioned detective work.
If you have a problem with your heart or liver, the diagnosis is likely to be made by a lab test or medical image. But neurologist Allan Ropper says those tests often fail when it comes to the brain.
Major food companies have cut trillions of calories, and studies show Americans are consuming fewer calories because of it. But some advocates think companies should do more to improve our diets.
Justin McCowan wanted to help find a cure for Alzheimer's because it's more common in people like him who have Down syndrome. He died in his sleep last week at age 40.
Angela Stimpson donated a kidney to a complete stranger. Why did she do it? Researchers found that the brains of Stimpson and other altruists are sensitive to fear and distress in a stranger's face.
Chronic stress can lead to heart disease, cancer and other health problems. A study shows it doesn't matter if the stress comes from major life events or minor hassles. Time to take a deep breath?
Scientists have evidence that beats in the brain — in the form of rhythmic electrical pulses — are involved in everything from memory to motion. And music can help when those rhythms go wrong.
Polls show that Sunshine State voters are likely to approve a measure legalizing medical marijuana in November. Businesses are already flocking to the state, eager to set up shop.
Insulin monitors and pumps are getting better, but a person with diabetes will tell you they're far from ideal. Potential solutions include one that delivers two hormones to control blood sugar.
Hospitals across the country are hiring pharmacists to work in their emergency departments. The goal is to try to prevent common errors that can cause injury and death.
Boys are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder than girls, though both sexes are equally affected. Women are increasingly seeking treatment as young adults.
Dustin Jones is visually impaired, but after he got a bioptic telescope he started driving. About 40 states allow severely nearsighted drivers to use this technology on the road.
Benzodiazepines like Xanax and Valium are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S. Patients and addicts often mix them with prescription painkillers — sometimes to deadly effect.
Some of the dangers of overdose associated with mixing benzos and opioids arise from primary care doctors actually prescribing the mix. Sean Mackey, the director of the Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab at Stanford, explains more.
In <em>Missing Microbes</em>, Dr. Martin Blaser argues that the overuse of antibiotics, as well as now-common practices like C-sections, may be messing with gut microbes.
New research finds that people with low levels of vitamin D are more likely to die from cancer, heart disease and other illnesses. Nutrition professor and author Marion Nestle explains.
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