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Your Health: Episodes

A woman's family is stuck with medical charges for care she received after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Negotiating relief from the bills has become a part-time job for her daughter.
A drug that's effective in patients with certain forms of melanoma is being tested as a treatment for other cancers whose genetic code contains an identical mutation.
Six years ago, husband-and-wife scientists used gene therapy to cure colorblindness in monkeys. Now they're trying to make it work for the millions of people with faulty color vision.
Advances in cancer treatments have made some forms of the disease a chronic condition. But protracted treatment, even when successful, comes at a high personal toll for patients and their families.
Cancer treatment for kids has changed dramatically since the 1960s. Back then, doctors experimented with approaches that seemed promising but were also potentially toxic. Some survivors look back.
Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971. The disease has proved far more complicated than doctors had hoped.
The limit for healthy drinking may be less than you think — one drink a day for women and two for men, according to health experts. New strategies aim to help heavy drinkers reduce their intake.
Researchers are starting to learn why, when we cross time zones or pull an all-nighter, our bodies get out of sync. <em>This story first aired March 10 on</em> Morning Edition.
Women who cooked the meals they saw prepared on television weighed more, on average, than those who simply watched, a study shows. The findings challenge the notion that home cooking is always best.
The brain's cerebellum helps shape thinking and emotion, as well as physical coordination, research shows. Could stimulating that part of the brain help ease some aspects of autism and schizophrenia?
Jonathan Keleher is one of a handful of people known to have lived their entire lives without a cerebellum. His experiences are helping scientists show how this brain structure helps shape who we are.
The flooring retailer says the tests used by its critics give a misleading impression of product safety. But Lumber Liquidators says it will pay for safety testing for customers who want it.
Health care should go beyond a doctor's office, the creators of this program say. Students work as health advocates, helping patients find affordable housing, fresh food and social services as needed.
One in four abortions is induced with medications rather than a surgical procedure. But the process faces a growing number of legal restrictions, including a law in Ohio.
Sometimes a different perspective can help you see a problem with fresh eyes. The problem to be solved in Gainesville, Fla.? A hot spot of poverty, child abuse and neglect.
The federal government now factors patient satisfaction ratings into the rates Medicare pays hospitals. Some hospitals with lower ratings are finding it's difficult to change patients' perceptions.
We have different clocks in virtually every organ of our bodies. But living against the clock — eating late at night or working overnight — may set the stage for weight gain and chronic disease.
A growing number of states are giving public money to crisis pregnancy centers. But the centers are unregulated, and abortion rights groups accuse them of coercing women with misinformation.
Telling your kids that they're superfabulous encourages narcissistic thinking, researchers say. And that doesn't bode well for their future happiness. Better to recognize effort and say, "I love you."
Two Philadelphia medical clinics support parents to help break generational cycles of trauma and abuse. Attending to adversity, doctors say, gives kids a better chance to grow up healthy.
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