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Your Health: Episodes

Tobacco's link to lung cancer, stroke and heart attack is well-known. But smokers are also more likely to die from kidney failure, infections and breast cancer, a revised tally suggests.
Many things raise the risk for cancer, including exposure to various toxins and radiation. But our knowledge about the range of chemicals and compounds that can trigger cancer is limited.
Mary Harris found out she was pregnant the day before she had scheduled surgery for breast cancer. It turns out there is limited data on how chemotherapy during pregnancy affects a baby.
Margaret Bentley, a woman in British Columbia, didn't want food or liquids if she became mentally disabled. But a nursing home is refusing to stop feeding her, even though she has Alzheimer's.
California lets kindergartners start school as long as they've had the first dose of all required vaccines. But some schools aren't tracking whether such kids end up getting all the doses they need.
Even though a disease like measles can spread easily through a workplace, employers often are reluctant to require employee vaccinations. Hospitals are one big exception.
After being diagnosed with cancer, people often ask one question first: "How long do I have?" Doctors usually overestimate the time, and patients often don't understand it's a range, not one number.
When a child falls ill with cancer, many of the drugs that might help are either experimental or unapproved for use in kids.
Our immune systems constantly fight off disease — protecting us from colds, flu and infection. An experimental treatment called immunotherapy is helping patients' immune systems fight off cancer.
The way a pediatrician talks with nervous parents about vaccines may determine whether the child gets immunized or not, a study suggests. Asking "What do you want to do about shots?" doesn't work.
Iggy Ignatius bet that immigrants from India would long to live with other Indians in his Florida condos. He was right. Psychologists say intimations of mortality make us want to be with our own kind.
Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg says she'll leave the job at the end of March after six years in the spotlight and controversies over Plan B emergency contraception.
The pressure, doctors say, is mostly coming from other parents who don't want their infants exposed to measles, whooping cough or other serious illnesses in the pediatric waiting room.
In his latest book, neuroscientist David Linden explains the science of touch. He tells <em>Fresh Air</em> how pain protects, why fingertips are so sensitive and why you can't read Braille with your genitals.
The father of a young child who had leukemia has a plea for other parents: Please vaccinate your children, because people with compromised immune systems, including his son, can't be vaccinated.
Returning immediately to demanding physical or mental activities after a concussion can be bad for the brain, neuroscientists agree. But what about after symptoms resolve? How much rest is best?
A simple blood test can analyze bits of fetal DNA leaked in the mother's bloodstream. It's less risky than invasive alternatives like amniocentesis, but it doesn't tell as much about fetal health.
The D.C.-based smartphone tool connects people with a ride to the hospital and a team of medical professionals trained in dealing with sexual assault. But students aren't rushing to download the app.
As vessels become more porous, researchers say, they allow toxins in the bloodstream to reach, and damage, delicate brain cells and raise the risk for dementia.
Although the Republican-led House decided not to vote to ban abortions after 20 weeks, 10 states already have such measures and more states are considering them.
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