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NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

Chinese President Hu Jintao's visit to Washington, D.C., this week comes at a critical moment in U.S.-China relations. Economically bruised, America may have to share the superpower spotlight with the competition.
Quinoa, once a staple of the Incas, is now increasingly popular in the United States. But over the past decade, the price has increased sevenfold, and its popularity abroad is pushing up prices and gradually making it harder for Bolivians to buy.
Numerous memorial services and Masses are taking place across Port-au-Prince Wednesday. But for many people, this anniversary is as much about this moment as it is about what happened a year ago.
Housing remains one of the biggest challenges facing Haiti after an earthquake destroyed much of the capital last year. But recently, thousands of people who've grown tired of living in temporary camps have started building houses in scrubby, vacant hills north of the capital.
During Sudan's civil war, Valentino Achak Deng fled to Ethiopia on foot, one of the so-called Lost Boys. Deng's life became a best-selling novel in the U.S., and he returned to his homeland to build a school. As Southern Sudan votes on independence, he says he harbors optimism about the future.
Many northern Sudanese are watching nervously as their southern compatriots vote today on whether to secede. They, too, expect the referendum will split Africa's largest country into two. But few people in northern Sudan are happy about the prospect.
Haitians are struggling with the slow pace of recovery. Officials and aid workers say part of the problem is coordination and understanding need.
As foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman is supposed to represent government policy, but instead he has directly contradicted it. Lieberman is seen as using his position to push forward his party's agenda -- often putting him in conflict with the prime minister.
Muqtada al-Sadr, the leader of a radical anti-American Shiite sect in Iraq, has returned home after nearly four years in exile. Sadr loyalists clashed repeatedly with U.S. forces and were thought to be behind much of the sectarian violence. Now, Sadr says his role in Iraq is political, not violent.
The effects of the magnitude 7.0 earthquake that devastated Haiti last year are everywhere. Rubble still covers much of the capital. More than 1 million people remain in improvised huts in makeshift encampments. Some progress is being made, but it's coming slowly.
Within Russia's borders, DDT's Yuri Shevchuk is bigger than Bono. Shevchuk has often engaged in Russian politics by attending rallies or peace demonstrations. But many in Russia see his frustration now reaching the boiling point: He's fed up that so few people are speaking out.
Young Iraqis differ from their parents in attitudes on politics, religion and even Saddam Hussein. These are the preliminary findings of a new survey of Iraqi youth, a generation born during a brutal dictatorship that experienced a U.S. invasion and witnessed violent religious extremism.
Young Iraqis differ from their parents in attitudes on politics, religion and even Saddam Hussein. These are the preliminary findings of a new survey of Iraqi youth, a generation born during a brutal dictatorship that experienced a U.S. invasion and witnessed violent religious extremism.
Mexican forces are outgunned in their fight against drug-trafficking organizations, facing an adversary that in some ways is like Colombia's insurgency. To help battle the cartels, a handful of Mexican police officers and soldiers get commando training from Colombia's elite Jungla unit.
In northwest Pakistan's war-torn Swat Valley, a member of the former royal family is creating jobs and dignity for widows on both sides of the conflict. A princess has founded a vocational center to teach women how to make traditional textiles -- and earn a living.
Go to France, Britain, Ireland or Portugal -- you'll find the same sentiment on the streets of all these debt-ridden European nations: Europe's financial crisis was caused by rich and greedy bankers and politicians, yet it's the poor who're picking up the tab -- people like Mariana Silva. Silva is paid ...
U.S. deaths in Afghanistan topped 500 this year, with thousands more wounded. Many of the injured pass through the hospital at Bagram Air Field. Treating so many war wounds brings its own grim benefits: New data are helping save lives in ways that were impossible only a few years ago.
Mexico's war with drug cartels has killed more than 30,000 people in the past four years. Many were gang members or somehow tied to the cartels; others were random bystanders. They include two teenagers who lived on opposite sides of the U.S.-Mexico border in very different worlds.
How many U.S. troops leave Afghanistan in 2011 will depend on what progress is made in the next six months. If it's underwhelming, there may be calls to change the current strategy. Alternatives that focus on counterterrorism rather than counterinsurgency are already in the making.
Jeanne Baret didn't set out to be the first woman to circumnavigate the globe when she stepped aboard the Etoile in 1766. Disguised as a man, the French botanist was looking for plants.
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