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NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

Both Israel and Hamas say they are unwilling to sign on to a bare-bones cease-fire. Some say the key to peace may be empowering the moderate Fatah party, but it's unclear who could broker such a deal.
Thousands of residents of Northern Gaza are heeding Israeli warnings and leaving their homes in anticipation of a new assault. U.N.-run schools expect to shelter tens of thousands of evacuees.
For the third time in five years, Israel has bombed Gaza in response to Hamas rocket fire. As Israel considers a ground invasion, Israelis note the grisly repetition, skeptical things will change.
China's one-child policy, introduced more than three decades ago, has had some unintended consequences. One is that, in the event of a child's death, many older parents lack a source of support.
The escalating conflict around the Gaza Strip has turned daily routines upside down. A family in Ashkelon, Israel, and one in Gaza City both take shelter — and struggle to keep their children safe.
In combating militants, one weapon is cutting off the groups' funding from charities or outside donors. But the "Islamic State" gets its money from other means and may be immune to U.S. techniques.
Brazil's ambitious effort to drive crime out of Rio de Janeiro's violent, low-income <em>favelas</em> ahead of the World Cup has had a mixed record. One positive effect: giving residents a say in local issues.
East German communism collapsed 25 years ago. But the city of Schwerin still has a Lenin statue, believed to be the last one in Germany. The mayor says it should stay because you can't erase history.
There's virtually no Brazilian fare inside the World Cup stadiums, but outside you'll find proud vendors of traditional foods. They fought FIFA to be there, and surprisingly, they won.
Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event.
In the remote cluster of rocks in the North Sea, knitting is a deeply ingrained tradition that stretches back for centuries — and persists despite the money that oil and gas have brought to Shetland.
It's typically a holy month of reflection for Muslims, but Iraqis face a bleak Ramadan this year. Extremists have taken over much of the country and show no sign of easing their fighting.
Paris streets are often too dangerous for kids to learn to ride, and most parents have no room to store bikes in their apartments. So the city has started renting bikes for the smallest Parisians.
In 2003, NPR's Scott Simon and Peter Breslow were in Iraq. Back then, the city of Tikrit had just been liberated by U.S. troops. Today, Islamic hardliners are once again in charge.
Riot police in Sao Paulo used tear gas and stun grenades against protesters angry over Brazil's attention to the World Cup over the needs of its people. The violence came before the first game began.
Cabbies from London to Berlin are protesting the smartphone-based, on-demand car service Uber. They say Uber should be subject to the same rules as taxis; many fear they'll be driven out of business.
Wartime rape has often been treated as something that's inevitable. A global summit in London looks for ways to stop the abuses and hold perpetrators responsible for sexual violence in conflict zones.
Libya faces some of its most serious upheaval since the fall of Moammar Gadhafi in 2011. No one knows that more than the prime minister who wasn't even in office a week before being forced out Monday.
It doesn't matter if it's Asia or Africa or Central America, kids make a goal out of something, throw out a ball and the game is on.
Seventy years ago, U.S. assault troops landed on Omaha Beach during the invasion of Normandy, deciding the course of history. What might be different today if they had been turned back?
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