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NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

When NPR's Scott Simon has visited Cuba, he saw two economies — one for tourists and one for residents. He reflects on whether the thaw between the U.S. and Cuba can really transform that country.
Tunisia launched the Arab uprisings four years ago when it ousted a dictator. Sunday's presidential election heralds the country's steady, but not-yet-guaranteed progress.
Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. That means jobs that in the U.S. are relatively safe and boring, like driving a bus, can be incredibly dangerous. It all starts with a phone call.
The Islamic State is not believed to be in the Gaza Strip. But a flier in its name was recently sent around the territory. Both Israel and Hamas are trying to use it to their advantage.
Most of us pack a lot of trips to the mall into the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas. But what if you could only go shopping for just a few hours once a month?
Audie Cornish talks to Australian terrorism expert David Kilcullen about the relationship between the Australian government and Muslim communities.
As the investigation into the presumed murder of 43 students in Mexico continues, one student who says he escaped the attacks describes how police surrounded the students' buses and began to fire.
Russia, China and other emerging market countries have been buying up large quantities of gold, something governments and individuals have done for centuries during uncertain economic times.
Mexican authorities recently identified the remains of one of the 43 students believed killed by drug traffickers working with police. Families are having a tough time believing the official story.
Many of the 5,000 Yazidi hostages in Iraq are women who are being raped. Those who return to their deeply conservative community face new trauma: shame, invasive "virginity tests," possible pregnancy.
Uruguay's audacious new law not only legalizes pot but also mandates that the government grow and distribute it. Some say the government has pinched more than it can roll.
Iran is now receiving about $700 million a month in sanctions relief while talks on its nuclear program carry on. That's raising eyebrows among one group of Americans with a traumatic history in Iran.
A woman in Kenya has been publicly stripped and molested nearly every day for two weeks for so-called "indecent dress." Cellphone video of the assaults have ignited condemnation, and copycat attacks.
Highly reliant on oil imports, Spain's government is encouraging oil exploration off the coast of the Canary Islands. But locals say the drilling threatens the natural attractions that draw tourists.
The pair fed and clothed Central American migrants on their way through Mexico. One of them, a transvestite, had been doing it for more than a decade and had received death threats.
In a remote village, poor children are on the front line of an education battle. The village's only educated person aims to teach them — and shame teachers who are paid but don't show up for work.
Negotiators extended a temporary deal limiting Iran's nuclear program, which was set to expire. Secretary of State John Kerry said Iran has been living up to the deal and talks should continue.
More than 2,000 tents still occupy city streets. The longer the pro-democracy demonstration goes on, the more unwelcome it becomes.
Many of the displaced ended up in camps in the city of Yola. Now they're racing further away as concerns grow that Yola also faces attack, and that the government isn't doing enough to stop it.
Staff members at a clinic in Sierra Leone were told to minimize treatments and expect few survivors. But they refused to follow that plan and came up with a safe way to boost the survival rate.
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