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NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

Latino activists have changed their strategy, tired of waiting for Congress to pass immigration legislation. Instead of pursuing lawmakers, many are calling on the White House to act on its own.
The city is so close to the U.S. border fence that it practically leans on it. Even as Tijuana diversifies, its economy still relies on the frontier. Its residents are the perfect border citizens.
Initially, she ran from agents in her attempt to illegally enter the U.S. But after three days alone in the Arizona desert, Brenda lit a fire to get their attention. Her story is not uncommon.
President Vladimir Putin's swift move to annex Crimea has been popular among many Russians. But when it comes to Russia's economy, many analysts think the country's prospects are looking weaker.
For those who viewed the end of the Soviet Union as a tragedy, Crimea was a chance to showcase Russia's strength. Now Russia may have changed its relationship with the outside world for years to come.
Venezuela placed controls on its currency as it rapidly lost its value. But that only made matters worse. Now it is rolling out a new system in hopes of stabilizing its weak currency.
Ukraine has a long history of impunity when it comes to its treatment of journalists and activists. A recent incident leaves many wondering if the new government will bring true change.
Border Patrol agents seem to be everywhere along the U.S. side of the Mexican border, and residents are also on guard. Yet amid distrust and heavy surveillance, there is compassion.
The deadly bacteria continue to sicken and kill people in Haiti. And the epidemic won't stop until the country provides basic sanitation. Many Haitians still don't even have latrines.
When doctors ran out of treatment options for her dying husband, Oxana Rucsineanu took matters into her own hands. The costly new drug she got for him has menacing side effects, but it might save him.
More than 600,000 Afghans are living in scores of camps around the country and say they can't return home because it's too dangerous. Their numbers have risen sharply in the past year.
Three years into Syria's civil war, a resigned stability and a sense of permanence are taking hold at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan.
Protests continue to rock Venezuela as peaceful marches have turned violent.The list of grievances — rising crime, inflation — is long, but the main one for many is the scarcity of basic food.
Nikos Aivatzidis hasn't been paid since 2012 because his employer is in a dispute with the debt-ridden government. But he's afraid that if he stops working, he'll lose decades' worth of severance pay.
Two ousted presidents, journalists and many activists are all on trial in the overburdened court system. Many cases stem from the country's political turmoil and there's no guarantee of a fair trial.
Student-led protesters are clashing with the security forces over a range of grievances that include inflation, joblessness, food shortages and high crime. Both sides appear to be digging in.
New container ships stack their cargo 10 stories high. They're so wide they won't fit through the Panama Canal until it's widened. Companies say this is what they need to survive in the 21st century.
One hundred years after the Great War, we're looking back at the history that wasn't. If Archduke Franz Ferdinand hadn't been killed in 1914, how would the world be different?
The soft drink giant is one of the few big U.S. firms with major investments in Russia. And the reasons why say a lot about why the U.S. has less leverage in Russia than it might like.
Some of Hollywood's most popular Westerns were filmed in Spain's Tabernas Desert. Today those sets are used in Western-style theme parks for bank heists, shoot-outs and saloon shows.
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