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NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

The two cases are the first in the country since 1999. The virus spread from neighboring Cameroon. When polio is on the move in Central Africa, the toll can be tragic.
Young ultra-Orthodox Jews are increasingly pursuing college degrees or joining the workforce. That's challenged matchmaking customs and led to a new service that connects like-minded men and women.
The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
Gold is not just about ornamentation in India. It's an insurance policy against bad economic times and bad marriages. Enterprising Indian women are using it to get loans to start small businesses.
Hundreds of Pentecostal churches have cropped up in Cameroon in the past decade. Now, the government is shutting some down, targeting churches that it says take advantage of poor, desperate people.
Men and women ski on the same slopes. A rock band performs in the capital. It's all part of the constant tug-of-war between religious conservatives and those seeking more social freedoms.
NPR's Jackie Northam was a freelance reporter based in Kenya when the Rwandan genocide erupted. In this essay, she recalls covering those terrible events and trying to make sense of them afterward.
The country's move to require animals to be stunned before being killed is seen by some as an affront to religious methods of slaughter. But now Jews and Muslims are working together to protest it.
In Guinea, an aggressive strain of the virus has claimed over 100 lives and invaded the capital city. But while it may take months to contain the outbreak, there already are survivors.
The brutality that began in Rwanda in April 1994 left 800,000 dead in just over three months. Some collapsed in grief as the country marked the anniversary of those dark days.
Latino activists have changed their strategy, tired of waiting for Congress to pass immigration legislation. Instead of pursuing lawmakers, many are calling on the White House to act on its own.
The city is so close to the U.S. border fence that it practically leans on it. Even as Tijuana diversifies, its economy still relies on the frontier. Its residents are the perfect border citizens.
Initially, she ran from agents in her attempt to illegally enter the U.S. But after three days alone in the Arizona desert, Brenda lit a fire to get their attention. Her story is not uncommon.
President Vladimir Putin's swift move to annex Crimea has been popular among many Russians. But when it comes to Russia's economy, many analysts think the country's prospects are looking weaker.
For those who viewed the end of the Soviet Union as a tragedy, Crimea was a chance to showcase Russia's strength. Now Russia may have changed its relationship with the outside world for years to come.
Venezuela placed controls on its currency as it rapidly lost its value. But that only made matters worse. Now it is rolling out a new system in hopes of stabilizing its weak currency.
Ukraine has a long history of impunity when it comes to its treatment of journalists and activists. A recent incident leaves many wondering if the new government will bring true change.
Border Patrol agents seem to be everywhere along the U.S. side of the Mexican border, and residents are also on guard. Yet amid distrust and heavy surveillance, there is compassion.
The deadly bacteria continue to sicken and kill people in Haiti. And the epidemic won't stop until the country provides basic sanitation. Many Haitians still don't even have latrines.
When doctors ran out of treatment options for her dying husband, Oxana Rucsineanu took matters into her own hands. The costly new drug she got for him has menacing side effects, but it might save him.
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