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World Story of the Day: Episodes

Ayelet Shaked is a secular Jew who belongs to a religious party closely tied to West Bank settlers. She's faced criticism for controversial statements about Palestinians.
With so many restrictions on their movements, it has never been easy for Saudi women to join the workforce. But the Internet has opened up a new range of opportunities to work from home.
They came to South Africa for jobs and to escape from conflicts. In March they were attacked with machetes and angry words. Now 500 foreign workers are stuck in a tent city outside Durban.
Yes there are other bands from Russia besides Pussy Riot. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Daniil Brod, lead singer for Pompeya, who says they wanted to create music that's sunny, light and fun.
Ebola put the country's immunization program on pause. Now officials are launching a nationwide vaccination campaign to stop the largest measles outbreak the country has seen in years.
In Arabic, <em>haqq</em> is the word for truth. Muslim software designers gathered recently for a "haqqathon" to develop social media products that can compete with violent extremists online.
London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. That imbalance has been an issue in the run-up to Thursday's election.
"If you're standing for the freedom of expression, you can't be at one moment for this freedom of expression, and two or three minutes later, against that," film critic Jean-Baptiste Thoret says.
Many of Nepal's historic treasures crumbled in last week's earthquake. But generations of wood and stone carvers have spawned a tradition that could help return monuments to their former glory.
U.S. Marines were deployed to the coastal Vietnamese city 50 years ago last month. Now, 40 years after the war's end and amid great change, former Viet Cong and an American reflect on that time.
Earthquake victims in Bhaktapur need food, water and shelter. They assert that the government is not delivering.
The men, resettled there after years in detention, say they aren't getting enough assistance. Camped outside the U.S. Embassy, they are seeking housing and other help reintegrating into society.
In honor of the 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War, WBUR's Bob Oakes tells the story of Charles McMahon, one of the last Marines to die in Vietnam.
The euro has dropped in value against the U.S. dollar by more than 20 percent since last summer. But even as Americans find bargains in Europe, flights to get there remain pricey for a few reasons.
Saturday's magnitude-7.8 quake released stress that was building for 150 years, scientists say, and it reshuffled tension to nearby faults.
One day after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit Nepal, killing more than 2,000 people, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks correspondent Julie McCarthy, who is in Kathmandu.
The clash at Gallipoli was one of the most memorable fights of World War I — and one of the most consequential. Its reverberations are still felt to this day in the chaotic Middle East.
The White House said Thursday that anti-terror operations inadvertently killed two American members of al-Qaida, Adam Gadahn and Ahmed Farouq, in the Afghan-Pakistan border region.
Turkey has moved up a major military celebration by a day this year. Critics say it's a clunky attempt to overshadow the 1915 slaughter of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire.
NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Dan Connell, visiting researcher at the Boston University African Studies Center, about the large number of young people emigrating to Europe from Eritrea.
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