Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

They beat the deadly virus, but transportation back home is hard to come by. So they're living in an abandoned hospital ward, hoping someday to resume the life they had before Ebola struck.
When a company told one French feminist it was "sorry" she found its ad sexist, she decided to fight back. She's launched a website where users target sexist companies and people on social media.
George Risi spent a month in Sierra Leone. The infectious disease specialist cared for more than 300 patients. About 100 died. Nothing could have prepared him for the experience.
JFK hospital shut down when several doctors died of Ebola. Now it's open again. And the staff is taking rigorous measures to make sure the virus doesn't make its way past the front gate.
Italy lags behind other EU states in guaranteeing equal rights for homosexuals. Gay couples have no legal recognition or adoption rights, and a bill that would make homophobia a crime has stalled.
Turkey is divided over how to respond to ISIS on its border and to Kurdish unrest within the country, making Turkey a shaky partner for the U.S.-led coalition.
You're not supposed to be able to buy cement commercially in Gaza, but some is being sold illicitly. The material is crucial for replacing homes and shops destroyed in the summer war.
Figures found on the walls of a prehistoric cave in Indonesia are at least 35,400 years old or more, scientists say. That might mean the earliest art developed independently in different regions.
There's a company town in Liberia with 80,000 residents. Ebola was first detected in March. Firestone's resourceful response has kept the virus from spreading.
From a quiet backwater, the former Portuguese colony of Macau has developed a sparkling skyline and 35 casinos with revenue six times that of Las Vegas — and more on the way.
Scotland has lowered the voting age from 18 to 16 for Thursday's referendum on independence. But it looks like the youngest voters won't be casting ballots in the way that many had initially expected.
Nutella, launched 50 years ago, has turned into a global phenomenon, boosting demand for hazelnuts. Now producers are looking beyond Turkey's north coast, where most of these nuts are grown.
Currently, Ebola is known to spread only through contact with body fluids. Some people have worried that Ebola could start spreading through the air. But scientists say that's not likely.
Today 27 countries are marking the European Day of Jewish Culture. The Tuscan town of Pitigliano is one of the sites involved: it's home to few Jews today, but once housed a thriving Jewish community.
The Parents Circle is a group of Israeli and Palestinian mothers and fathers who have lost children in the conflict. Two of them visited NPR and said this summer's war has only made conditions worse.
In a land where police have a reputation for corruption and violence, Titus Musila is a rare officer who is popular. Now that he's accused of a vigilante killing, residents have rallied around him.
The farming town of Barkedu accounts for a fifth of Liberia's Ebola deaths. Residents have revved up anti-Ebola efforts. But the virus has swept away entire families, and there's no end in sight.
Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba's initial public stock offering in New York is expected to be one of the biggest ever. It's come a long way since a former English teacher founded it in 1999.
China's largest fair devoted to fine art photography opened in Shanghai this weekend. The first-time event includes more than 500 works from photographers around the world.
As Iraqi and American forces battle militants in the north, there are fears the turmoil could fuel new killings in the capital.
Please wait...