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NPR Topics: World Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

Scotland has lowered the voting age from 18 to 16 for Thursday's referendum on independence. But it looks like the youngest voters won't be casting ballots in the way that many had initially expected.
Nutella, launched 50 years ago, has turned into a global phenomenon, boosting demand for hazelnuts. Now producers are looking beyond Turkey's north coast, where most of these nuts are grown.
Currently, Ebola is known to spread only through contact with body fluids. Some people have worried that Ebola could start spreading through the air. But scientists say that's not likely.
Today 27 countries are marking the European Day of Jewish Culture. The Tuscan town of Pitigliano is one of the sites involved: it's home to few Jews today, but once housed a thriving Jewish community.
The Parents Circle is a group of Israeli and Palestinian mothers and fathers who have lost children in the conflict. Two of them visited NPR and said this summer's war has only made conditions worse.
In a land where police have a reputation for corruption and violence, Titus Musila is a rare officer who is popular. Now that he's accused of a vigilante killing, residents have rallied around him.
The farming town of Barkedu accounts for a fifth of Liberia's Ebola deaths. Residents have revved up anti-Ebola efforts. But the virus has swept away entire families, and there's no end in sight.
Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba's initial public stock offering in New York is expected to be one of the biggest ever. It's come a long way since a former English teacher founded it in 1999.
China's largest fair devoted to fine art photography opened in Shanghai this weekend. The first-time event includes more than 500 works from photographers around the world.
As Iraqi and American forces battle militants in the north, there are fears the turmoil could fuel new killings in the capital.
Shacki Kamara went out to buy his aunt some tea. Then she heard from the neighborhood kids: "They shot Shacki." He died the next day. Eva Nah is still asking why.
Engineers at Stanford University have designed a microscope that fits in your pocket and costs less than a dollar to make. Here's the best part: You put the microscope together yourself.
A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
The sad spectacle of Gaza's bombed-out airport doesn't deter Palestinians from hoping to someday have another airport of their own.
The Roman emperor Hadrian built a wall two millennia ago that kept the Scottish out. On Sept. 18, the Scots hold an independence vote to decide if they want to separate from Britain.
News from Mosul has been scarce since the Islamic State took power. Speaking by phone, Iraqis say the group has imposed strict controls that are alienating residents and are providing few services.
Both Israel and Hamas say they are unwilling to sign on to a bare-bones cease-fire. Some say the key to peace may be empowering the moderate Fatah party, but it's unclear who could broker such a deal.
Thousands of residents of Northern Gaza are heeding Israeli warnings and leaving their homes in anticipation of a new assault. U.N.-run schools expect to shelter tens of thousands of evacuees.
For the third time in five years, Israel has bombed Gaza in response to Hamas rocket fire. As Israel considers a ground invasion, Israelis note the grisly repetition, skeptical things will change.
China's one-child policy, introduced more than three decades ago, has had some unintended consequences. One is that, in the event of a child's death, many older parents lack a source of support.
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