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Technology: Episodes

About 5 billion people are mostly or entirely disconnected from the Internet. So to capitalize on this opportunity, Google and Facebook have begun high-profile campaigns to connect the unconnected.
While the U.S. is pretty well connected, there are still 20 million people who aren't online. Lee Rainie of Pew Research describes who they are and why that matters.
Why is it so hard to feel empathy for strangers? Because we're stressed by them, says neuroscientist Jeff Mogil. His research suggests one way to reduce that stress: play Rock Band together.
Several crimes around the U.S. have been tied to the website's in-person transactions. So police departments are offering up their parking lots to provide a secure space for buying and selling stuff.
A Syrian refugee has developed a phone app and website to help refugees get information on services and seek other help in their long journeys in limbo.
What's behind the curious food fad of <em>mukbang</em>, or live-streamed broadcasts of people eating endless amounts of food? The genre is so popular in South Korea that its stars pull in $10,000 a month.
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Jessica Bennett, contributor to <em>The New York Times</em>, about Monica Lewinsky's efforts to rebrand herself as an anti-cyberbullying activist.
White collar workers thought their jobs were safe, but nobody can escape the robots. A look at one of the more surprising human occupations to fall to the robot armies: sports and financial reporting.
If you're trying out for a job, the one judging you may not be a person — it could be a computer. Algorithms are evaluating human voices to determine which ones are engaging, calming and trustworthy.
Without a doubt, the Internet in Cuba is tough. The politics are thorny; getting it is difficult. But there are signs that change is on the horizon.
The year 2020 will be the first time the Census will be available online. But the Census Bureau must persuade hard-to-reach groups to take the survey. So they're doing a practice run in Savannah, Ga.
NPR's Don Gonyea interviews Meg James, a corporate media reporter for the <em>Los Angeles Times</em>, about reports that say Apple plans to offer a "skinny" package of channels for cable cord cutters.
Health insurer Premera Blue Cross says hackers may have compromised 11 million of its customer accounts. Such attacks are worrying companies, and they're increasingly turning to cyber insurance.
The Web browser will be replaced in Windows 10, with what's currently being called Project Spartan.
The health insurance provider has revealed that a cyberattack discovered in January may have made the medical and financial information of 11 million people vulnerable to thieves.
Most of us have had that moment of hitting "send" on a text and immediately wishing we could take it back. Of course there's an app for that, but that technical solution also has its issues.
ISIS militants now control the long-running black market in stolen artifacts. Experts are tracking damage to heritage sites in Iraq and Syria by satellite and doing what little they can to stop it.
Consumers will have to have an Apple device to subscribe to HBO Now, but then they can watch new and old HBO content on that device or their PC. It will cost $14.99 a month.
The new Silicon Valley campus has been the subject of fevered speculation. A sneak preview finds a site full of green features, but neighbors may not be welcome to stroll the premises.
Writer Philip Pullman says it's all part of the oral tradition: "Long before writing, people were telling each other stories," he says. Audiobook technology has come a long way since the early days.
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