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Pop Culture: Episodes

The <em>Star Trek</em> actor, writer, poet and photographer has died of lung disease at 83. NPR's Neda Ulaby has a look back at the long career of the man who was (and was not) Spock.
Glen Weldon and Petra Mayer talk about Scott McCloud's <em>The Sculptor </em>and recommend other graphic novels you might enjoy.
It's a week of good TV as we say farewell to Pawnee, Indiana and dive into the story of <em>Breaking Bad</em>'s grimy defense attorney, who now has his own prequel.
New episodes of Netflix's <em>House of Cards</em> debut today, and NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says this season's challenges may please critics who say the show's vision of Washington, D.C., runs too smoothly.
The new CBS show about two very mismatched investigative partners plays like a comedy. The characters are complicated and surprising, and the dialogue is crisp and quick. It's "a lot of fun to watch."
As much of the country shivers in the grip of a nasty winter, NPR movie critic Bob Mondello ponders cinematic heat — the movies that smolder, swelter and sizzle no matter what the mercury says.
The British series is set during and after World War II. Detective Foyle tackles crimes connected to the war — murder and spying, black markets and profiteering. It's "terrifically entertaining."
For those of you who skipped the Oscars on Sunday night (or fell asleep during the nearly four-hour broadcast), let us fill you in on the highlights.
From civil rights to immigration and health issues such as Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's diseases, advocacy was a big part of last night's show. Here's what people are saying about it Monday.
It's a classic element of the Oscars telecast: that sequence of clips paying tribute to film industry greats. Chuck Workman created them for 20 years, and likens his craft to making a fruitcake.
On this week's show, all eight Best Picture nominees, strong feelings from all concerned, and the rare feeling that a fistfight might be about to ensue.
Can you name the longest title of a film nominated for best picture? Or most Oscar-nominated family? At O'Brien's Irish Pub in Santa Monica, the trivia night regulars are former game show champions.
Linda Holmes and movie critic Bob Mondello sit down with Audie Cornish to talk about the upcoming Oscars.
Sharpen your Swiss Army knives and grab an extra roll of duct tape, because Mac may be coming back. The creators are looking to the fans to design the new show. And there's one big twist.
Wilmore is still fine-tuning <em>The Nightly Show, </em>which fills the late-night spot on Comedy Central vacated by Stephen Colbert. The show launched just as Wilmore's 20-year marriage was coming to an end.
In movies, crowd noise, hospital waiting room chatter and barroom brawl sounds are created by voice actors called loopers. "If it's done right, you shouldn't even notice it," one sound mixer says.
NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Burr — just back from a trip to India — about comedy abroad, and how difficult it is for an American to find material that will make the world laugh.
Whether they find Valentine's Day "icky," or the "Christmas of love," stand-up comics Jim Gaffigan, Marina Franklin and Ted Alexandro all find plenty of funny material in romance — or the lack of it.
<em>Saturday Night Live</em> celebrates its 40th anniversary on Sunday. Throughout, the show's two photographers have been flies on the wall, capturing read-throughs, rehearsals and back-stage shenanigans.
On this week's show: the Wachowskis' new kooky space adventure, the power of chemistry, and what's making us happy this week.
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