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NPR: Planet Money Podcast: Episodes

<p>In west Africa right now, there are two kinds of countries: Those that have Ebola and those that do not. Liberia for instance, has reported more than 6,000 cases of Ebola and 2,697 people have died. Right next door, in the country of Ivory Coast, there have been zero cases. Zero. Ivory Coast would ...
<p>There's a term in economics, arbitrage, that basically means free money. It's finding a difference in price, a pricing mistake, you can exploit to make money. Arbitrage is a risk-free way to buy low and sell high. Everyday there are loads of people and sophisticated computer algorithms searching for ...
<p>A gallon of gas is selling at some pumps for less than $3 right now. The price has been falling since early summer, and local TV news reporters are out at gas stations asking people 'how happy do you feel?'&#160;</p><p>Today on the show, two stories from the other side of the pump. Stories about the ...
<p>In big-time college football or basketball, money is everywhere. From giant TV contracts, to million-dollar coaches' salaries, to deals with shoe companies. But it's against NCAA rules for colleges to pay athletes. On today's show, we ask: Is the NCAA's ban on paying athletes legal?</p>
<p>In Nigeria, millions of gallons of oil are stolen all the time. There are advertisements for stolen oil on the Nigerian version of Craigslist, and not JUST small containers. The advertisements are for giant tankers full of oil. &#160;</p><p>Today on the show, how to steal hundreds of thousands of ...
<p><em>Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in&#160;<a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2012/09/07/160748725/episode-400-what-two-pasta-factories-tell-us-about-the-italian-economy" target="_blank">September 2012</a>.&#160;</em></p><p>A decade ago, the Barilla pasta factory in Foggia, ...
<p><span>Today on the show, a Republican governor lives the dream. He cuts taxes dramatically in his state, and he promises good times ahead. But the good times do not come. Now he's fighting for his political life. For more:&#160;http://n.pr/1pBNfq7</span></p>
<p>Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men. But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing. But in 1984, something changed. The number of ...
<p><em>Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in&#160;June 2012.&#160;</em></p><p>A few years ago, Jestina Clayton started a hair braiding business in her home in Centerville, Utah. The business let her stay home with her kids, and in good months, she made enough to pay for groceries. She even ...
<p>The popularity of fondue wasn't an accident. It was planned by a cartel of Swiss cheese makers, which ruled the Swiss economy for 80 years. On today's show: Swiss cheese. A story about what happens when well-meaning folks decide that the rules of economics don't apply to them. And got the world to ...
<p>Today's show is the story of a guy who tried to make something of himself by getting into a rough business: debt collection. It's also the story of the low-level, semi-legal debt-collection economy that sprung up in Buffalo, New York. And, in a small way, it's the story of the last 20 or so years ...
<p>Prices of new textbooks have been going up like crazy. Faster than clothing, food, cars, and even healthcare. Listeners have been asking for years why textbooks are getting so expensive. On today's show, we actually find an answer.</p><p>&#160;</p>
<p><span>Today on the show: Stories about the secrets of jewelry stores, the problem with World's Fairs and a law signed by Abraham Lincoln that's being used today to go after the largest banks in the world.&#160;<span>For more:&#160;</span><span class="current-shortlink">n.pr/<span>1prjqYP</span></span><span>&#160;</span></span></p> ...
<p>Charities raised $1.4 billion to help rebuild Haiti after the earthquake. After the tsunami in Asia in 2004, organizations raised $1.6 billion. But when something like Ebola happens, so far, people look the other way. On today's show: What does it take to get people to notice something half a world ...
<p><em>Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in&#160;<a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/08/06/209598383/episode-477-waiting-for-robot-nannies" target="_blank">August 2013</a>. &#160;</em></p><p>More than half of all Japanese women quit their jobs after giving birth to their first ...
<p>On today's show, we read our homeowners insurance policy. The details are amazing. Lava! Vermin! Falling objects! And, hiding in all the fine print, the story of how insurance works &#8212; and what makes it break.</p>
<p>Alex Blumberg is starting a business, a podcasting business. And he's recording himself as he starts the company &#8212; he's making a&#160;podcast&#160;about starting his podcasting company. Meta, right? &#160;</p><p>But starting a business can be lonely. Alex wants a partner to share in the stress ...
<p>An amazing amount of stuff on the internet is free &#8212; Facebook, Twitter and Gmail. Of course, it's not exactly free. We pay, with our data. And right now, we're kind of stuck trading our data, for all this free software. Today on the show: two people who want to give you other options. These ...
<p>For years now, the economy has been kind of stuck. The unemployment rate is getting better, but slowly. Household incomes have actually been falling. It's easy to feel stuck. Today on the show, stories of two people trying to get unstuck.</p>
<p>Zoo animals are different than most possessions, because zoos follow a fundamental principle: You can't sell or buy the animals. It's unethical and illegal to put a price tag on an elephant's head.&#160;<span>Today on the show: What do you do in a world where you can't use money?&#160;</span>For more: ...
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