Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

NPR: Planet Money Podcast: Episodes

<p>Prices of new textbooks have been going up like crazy. Faster than clothing, food, cars, and even healthcare. Listeners have been asking for years why textbooks are getting so expensive. On today's show, we actually find an answer.</p><p>&#160;</p>
<p><span>Today on the show: Stories about the secrets of jewelry stores, the problem with World's Fairs and a law signed by Abraham Lincoln that's being used today to go after the largest banks in the world.&#160;<span>For more:&#160;</span><span class="current-shortlink">n.pr/<span>1prjqYP</span></span><span>&#160;</span></span></p> ...
<p>Charities raised $1.4 billion to help rebuild Haiti after the earthquake. After the tsunami in Asia in 2004, organizations raised $1.6 billion. But when something like Ebola happens, so far, people look the other way. On today's show: What does it take to get people to notice something half a world ...
<p><em>Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in&#160;<a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/08/06/209598383/episode-477-waiting-for-robot-nannies" target="_blank">August 2013</a>. &#160;</em></p><p>More than half of all Japanese women quit their jobs after giving birth to their first ...
<p>On today's show, we read our homeowners insurance policy. The details are amazing. Lava! Vermin! Falling objects! And, hiding in all the fine print, the story of how insurance works &#8212; and what makes it break.</p>
<p>Alex Blumberg is starting a business, a podcasting business. And he's recording himself as he starts the company &#8212; he's making a&#160;podcast&#160;about starting his podcasting company. Meta, right? &#160;</p><p>But starting a business can be lonely. Alex wants a partner to share in the stress ...
<p>An amazing amount of stuff on the internet is free &#8212; Facebook, Twitter and Gmail. Of course, it's not exactly free. We pay, with our data. And right now, we're kind of stuck trading our data, for all this free software. Today on the show: two people who want to give you other options. These ...
<p>For years now, the economy has been kind of stuck. The unemployment rate is getting better, but slowly. Household incomes have actually been falling. It's easy to feel stuck. Today on the show, stories of two people trying to get unstuck.</p>
<p>Zoo animals are different than most possessions, because zoos follow a fundamental principle: You can't sell or buy the animals. It's unethical and illegal to put a price tag on an elephant's head.&#160;<span>Today on the show: What do you do in a world where you can't use money?&#160;</span>For more: ...
<p>A massive Chinese company, Alibaba, is about to have what could be the biggest public offering on planet earth.</p><p>You can think of Alibaba like Amazon or Ebay, except you can buy way more &#8212; you can get a used&#160;747 airplane, or an&#160;oil tanker, or 500 million tiny screws.</p><p>Today ...
<p>Some people write a squiggle. Others just write an initial. One person draws a dude surfing. Today on the show: the signature. It's supposed to say, "This is me." But where did the idea come from? And why are we still using it? We consult a rabbi, a lawyer and a credit card executive.</p>
<p><span>The world is full of people talking about how right they are. Today on the show, we try something different: We talk to smart, thoughtful people about times they got things really, really wrong. For more:&#160;http://n.pr/1lfnG0Y</span></p>
<p>The Westfield Valley Fair Mall in California is like any other mall except for one thing: half of the mall is in the city of San Jose and the other half is in the city of Santa Clara. The boundary line runs right through the mall. For a long time, this didn't matter. But in 2012, one city &#8212; ...
<p><em>Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in<span class="Apple-converted-space">&#160;</span><a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/09/11/221417806/episode-485-whats-your-major" target="_blank">September 2013</a>. </em>Sure, some college degrees lead to higher paying jobs than others. ...
<p>We spend a lot of time thinking about the future and planning for the future. Fifty years ago, people at the 1964 World's Fair built their vision of the future. They imagined a world of jet-packs, steel, glass, and Formica. And they committed to it in a park in New York City.</p><p>Today on the show, ...
<p>The 100 dollar bill is the most popular product from the Federal Reserve. Eighty percent of all U.S. cash is in the form of 100 dollar bills, but you rarely see them. About twenty years ago, the Fed counted up all the hundreds it knew about &#8212; money in bank vaults and cash registers &#8212; and ...
<p>Thousands of&#160;<a href="http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2014307190012" target="_blank">people</a>&#160;in Detroit haven't paid their water bills. Even some&#160;<a href="http://www.freep.com/article/20140709/NEWS01/307090141/Detroit-water-shut-offs-companies-customers" target="_blank">businesses</a>&#160;have ...
<p><em>Note: Today's show is a rerun. It originally ran in&#160;<a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/04/12/177063399/episode-451-why-some-people-love-tax-day" target="_blank">April 2013</a>.</em></p><p>In 2012, a federal program took about $60 billion from wealthier Americans and gave it to millions ...
<p>Super PACs let rich people, corporations and unions spend as much money as they want to try to influence the outcome of elections.</p><p>On today's show: How a Harvard professor created a<span class="Apple-converted-space">&#160;</span><a href="https://mayday.us/" target="_blank">super PAC</a><span ...
<p>In most parts of the world, refugees are not allowed to work. But Mohammed Osman Ali is a refugee in Uganda, and there, he legally runs a video game arcade and a variety store.</p><p>Today on the show, why most countries won't let refugees work. And why Uganda is trying something different.</p>
Please wait...