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Science: Episodes

John Cruden returns to the department as litigation over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill intensifies. He'll also defend Obama climate change rules and try to protect wildlife while in the post.
Ants don't show road rage. In fact, some research shows they rarely get into traffic jams and are able to maintain a steady speed even as their numbers swell. Can physics explain it?
Nothing worse than being bulled in school, especially if you're a fish. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Dr. Martin Haulena from the Vancouver Aquarium about a fish that was picked on by schoolmates.
Scientists say they are closer to knowing how, or rather why, the zebra got its stripes. It's an answer that would impress even Rudyard Kipling.
Jason Comely's fear of rejection was so strong that he'd become completely isolated. So he set out to get himself rejected at least once a day, every day. Funny thing is, it worked.
A new study finds that the academic disciplines most associated with "geniuses" are also the fields in which women are underrepresented.
They could shoot up to 24,000 feet and maintain that altitude in a long-distance migration across the Himalayas. But it's more efficient for bar-headed geese to soar and dive, scientists find.
You say banana; this orangutan says ... well, it's hard to tell what she's saying. But the rhythmic, speechlike sounds of the zoo-dwelling ape have started scientists talking.
The rules are mostly voluntary, which disappoints environmental groups, but they should ratchet down the amount of leaked methane from new or modified oil and gas operations, which contributes to climate change.
New GMO potatoes don't bruise as easily, and, when fried, they have less of a potentially harmful chemical. Yet some big chip and french fry makers won't touch them because of the stigma of GMOs.
The holiday season is a big time of year for charitable giving. Host Audie Cornish speaks with NPR's Shankar Vedantam about a study that says portion of charitable giving is driven by social pressure.
<em>Weekend Edition</em> staff have been picking their favorite interviews from 2014. Editor Natalie Winston talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about an interview with an evangelical Christian climate scientist.
NPR's Rachel Martin takes a moment to talk about a new fish discovered in one of the deepest places on Earth.
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered a link between what you taste and what you hear.
Inspired by the snails' spiky shells and acid-loving nature, researchers named the new species <em>Alviniconcha strummeri</em>, after Clash frontman Joe Strummer.
In San Francisco Bay, researchers are using new technology to investigate shipwrecks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with James Delgado, director of Maritime Heritage at NOAA, about what they've found.
From monkeys to microbes, TED speakers in this playlist cover all different realms of the scientific world.
Psychologist Daniel Goleman, author of <em>Emotional Intelligence</em>, examines why we aren't more compassionate more of the time.
Author Robert Wright says humans are not simply wired to be compassionate — we have evolved to feel compassion out of self-interest.
Marine scientists plumbing the deepest part of the ocean sent microphones and collection probes baited with chicken to the bottom of a trench near Guam. Now they watch, wait ... and listen.
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