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Science: Episodes

Researchers say their study suggests that more diabetes is being detected in particular states because, thanks to Medicaid, more poor people have access to screening and care.
John Hargrove says he left SeaWorld after seeing "devastating effects of captivity" on orcas. His new book is <em>Beneath The Surface</em>. SeaWorld disputes such claims and says it treats whales with respect.
Medical researchers have made only modest progress treating the most common cancers since the war on cancer was declared in 1971. The disease has proved far more complicated than doctors had hoped.
The limit for healthy drinking may be less than you think — one drink a day for women and two for men, according to health experts. New strategies aim to help heavy drinkers reduce their intake.
Researchers are starting to learn why, when we cross time zones or pull an all-nighter, our bodies get out of sync. <em>This story first aired March 10 on</em> Morning Edition.
Scientists outfitted some fake fungi with LEDs and put them in a Brazilian forest to test their theory that light, not some funky mushroom fragrance, was luring bugs.
Researchers who helped develop powerful techniques warn that tweaking the genome is now easy. More public debate's needed, they say, before making changes in genes passed from parent to child.
How much does a bee sting hurt, exactly? How about a bullet ant bite? An entomologist has built an index ranking insect stings — after getting stung more than 1,000 times.
Why are 20 tons of fossils being stored in the bell tower at the University of California at Berkeley? A look into the world's only paleontological collection that has its own carillon.
It's all in the timing. Biologists haven't been able to breed embryos of the rare, pillar coral in the lab because it's been tough to catch the creatures in the act.
<strong></strong>The hormone that controls blood sugar among diabetics is one of the oldest medicines used today. But more than 90 years after its discovery, a low-cost version is no longer available in the U.S.
A child stricken with the deadliest form of the disease can quickly fall unconscious and die. A doctor in Michigan has dedicated her life to figuring out how this happens. At last, she has the answer.
Does Spring Break cause an increase in traffic fatalities? There's new research that may give parents and students pause.
Robots are coming — in fact they're already here. One exhibit at the South by Southwest interactive festival lets visitors get up close and personal to our future overlords.
Women who cooked the meals they saw prepared on television weighed more, on average, than those who simply watched, a study shows. The findings challenge the notion that home cooking is always best.
Cocoa is unusually susceptible to disease. Every year, a third of the crop is destroyed, even as the appetite for chocolate grows. That's why the world needs the International Cocoa Quarantine Centre.
Want to impress the guests at your local Pi Day celebration this Saturday (3/14/15, hopefully at 9:26)? Pick up some tidbits of mathematical trivia from Keith Devlin.
NPR's Scott Simon talks with Alan Rusbridger, editor of <em>The Guardian</em>, about his recent column detailing his personal motivation for intensifying the paper's focus on climate change coverage.
The oldest mummies in the world are in northern Chile. Preserved for seven thousand years, the mummies are now deteriorating, and scientists say climate changes are to blame.
Health care should go beyond a doctor's office, the creators of this program say. Students work as health advocates, helping patients find affordable housing, fresh food and social services as needed.
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