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Science: Episodes

Once embraced by cities for its beautiful white flowers, disease resistance and ability to grow just about anywhere, the Callery pear is now considered a nuisance due to its smell and invasive nature.
Early next month, California plans to finalize its emergency water conservation plan. Cities are under the gun to cut their water usage from anywhere between 15 and 40 percent.
The U.S. epidemic of injected-opioid use could lead to more severe outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C, like those now occurring in Indiana, the Centers for Disease Control And Prevention says.
The world's largest ant colony stretches over 3,700 miles. It succeeds, biologist Deborah Gordon says, because no ant is in charge. They communicate with algorithmic patterns to survive and thrive.
Launched shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Hubble telescope isn't showing its age. Astronomers and other fans hope this old charmer will be useful for many years to come.
NPR has this tribute to the Hubble Space Telescope — a parody of Iggy Azalea's "Trouble."
Friday marks 25 years since the Hubble Space Telescope was launched. Astrophysicist and NPR blogger, Adam Frank, celebrates what it's shown us.
Friction between close business partners is the reason many startups fail. But increasingly in Silicon Valley, co-founders of companies are turning to therapists before things go south.
A doctor-scientist's long quest to help children with a rare form of brain cancer has led to the discovery that high levels of brain activity can make glioma tumors grow faster.
By editing the genes in embryos in the lab, Chinese scientists showed that it's possible to change hereditary traits that cause a blood disorder. But the work also created unintended mutations.
In Michigan's orchard country, extreme heat and cold can mean disaster for fruit growers. Now some are using a new twist on old technology to fool trees when sudden, unexpected weather changes occur.
Two new studies published in the journal <em>Nature</em> point to a connection between a class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids and a decline in bee health. What's bad for bees is bad for crops, too.
NPR's Melissa Block speaks to Brian Deese, President Obama's senior adviser in charge of climate policy, about the Obama administration's push for new restrictions around power plant emissions.
Researchers set hungry mosquitoes loose on identical and fraternal twins. They found that inherited genes do play a role in making you a mosquito magnet.
Doctors, it turns out, often don't follow evidence-based guidelines. One result? Unnecessary tests. Scientists who study this contrariness think they know why.
The product is called Snus — a tiny bag of tobacco that users slip between the lip and gum. Its Swedish maker claims the product is safer than cigarettes, cigars, dip and chewing tobacco.
Scientists are still better than computers at assessing a neuron's health by looking at its shape. But an effort that includes an international series of hackathons could help speed the process.
To keep its code-breaking prowess, the National Security Agency must recruit scores of the brightest students in math and computer science each year. The Snowden revelations are hurting those efforts.
Clinicians correctly predict a suicide attempt about half the time — no better than a coin toss. Certain tests of involuntary responses, although still experimental, aim to improve the odds.
A program in Hawaii aims to reduce the number of older people who spend their final days of life in a hospital. Hawaii has one of the highest rates of hospital deaths for those over age 65 in the U.S.
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