Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

Science: Episodes

The bird is now protected under the Endangered Species Act, which could stop some oil and gas development in Colorado and Utah — and will likely start a number of legal challenges.
Scientists have established contact with the lander, but they're not sure where on the comet it is. The lander apparently bounced after touching down, and its future may be uncertain.
The northern U.S. is getting a blast of unseasonably cold weather, thanks to what has been dubbed a "bomb cyclone." <em>The Washington Post</em>'s Jason Samenow explains that and other odd weather terms.
Scientists say a new deal between the U.S. and China on greenhouse gases is a positive move toward new models for controlling emissions, but that it won't keep the Earth from dangerous levels of warming.
The European Space Agency on Wednesday successfully landed a probe on the surface of a comet — something that has never been done before. But scientists say the lander may not be fully secure.
China and the U.S. account for more than a third of greenhouse gases — making it vital that any broad climate plans include the pair.
There's more than one way to make color, nature tells us. And more than one way to use it to your own advantage.
The federal government is shutting down cod fishing in the Gulf of Maine for the next six months. But fishermen, who now face an uncertain future, dispute the government's cod counts.
Putting a probe on a comet's surface would be a first for mankind. But it doesn't look like it will be easy.
A highly sensitive blood test for Ebola exists, so why isn't it being used to test all returning health workers from West Africa? Because the virus isn't in the blood in the first stages of infection.
<em>The New England Journal of Medicine</em> published an editorial against quarantining people who have worked with Ebola patients in Africa. Renee Montagne speaks with Dr. Lindsey Baden, one of the authors.
A science superstar at Caltech advises young women to not wait for encouragement to succeed. Just go do it, she says. But her admiring students say that approach doesn't work for everybody.
A 700-year-old caribou dropping from northern Canada holds surprisingly well-preserved viruses. There's no evidence the viruses are dangerous, but they are scientifically interesting.
New research suggests umpires are hesitant to make calls that change the course of the game, especially in games with high stakes.
"When I first saw him he had a little bit of eye movement and that was really the only way he could communicate," says Eric Sellers, who helped a patient use a brain-computer interface to communicate.
Peter Hubbard is one of 20 volunteers in a human safety test of an experimental Ebola vaccine. He tells NPR's Scott Simon about why he signed up and how he has been feeling.
Wind power is a growing part of the energy mix in the United States. And more wind turbines means there are new jobs for people to install and repair them. The job requires a unique skill set.
David Christian explains the history of the universe from the big bang, and how humans occupy little more than a millisecond on that cosmic timeline.
Paleontologist Jack Horner explains what dinosaurs tell us about our own origins and what we can learn by attempting to revive a piece of the past.
Louise Leakey describes her family's long search for early human remains in Africa, and how unlocking that mystery is the key to understanding our past and our future.
Please wait...