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Science: Episodes

Operators of the Turkey Point nuclear plant near Miami have received federal permission to run their cooling system above the old 100 degree limit. The decision is meant to combat algae growth and rising temperature in cooling canals, but environmental groups in nearby Biscayne National Park are concerned.
What does a 20 percent chance of rain or snow actually mean? Interpreting probabilities in forecasts can be hard even for mathematicians and meteorologists — never mind the average person.
For one month every summer, hundreds of thousands of purple martins stop by an abandoned shopping mall parking lot in Austin, Texas, on their way to the Amazon Basin. Reporter Luke Quinton visited this year's roosting and offers a glimpse of the phenomenon.
The Rosetta spacecraft hibernated for 31 months while its orbit took it too far away from the sun for its solar arrays to keep it operational. It's ready for a rendezvous with a comet Aug. 6.
Ted Stanley is giving $650 million to the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard to find and treat the genetic underpinnings of mental illnesses. His son has bipolar disorder.
Florida native Lauren Arrington discovered that invasive lionfish, which usually live in the ocean, could survive in nearly fresh water. The 12-year-old's experiment blew away professional scientists.
Forty-five years after man first walked on the moon, Alan Bean, who was part of the second lunar landing, talks to NPR's Arun Rath about his stormy launch and how he translates space travel into art.
A number of scientists and others members of the AIDS research community died in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with journalist and editor in chief of HIV Plus magazine Diane Anderson-Minshall about the loss.
Julia Hoeh is a bat tracker. For $350 a week plus basic housing in rural Tennessee, she stays up long after midnight to affix radio trackers to bats and collect samples of their DNA.
Sunday is the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Buzz Aldrin about his new YouTube channel, where anyone can share memories from the historic day.
TED Radio Host Guy Raz speaks with science writer and Sports Illustrated contributor David Epstein about why athletes are getting faster and stronger every year.
Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 had been carrying several researchers and activists on their way to a global AIDS conference in Australia. Among them was Dr. Joep Lange, a leading researcher and former president of the International AIDS Society. He was a giant in the field and a mentor to many.
Maybe we can learn from fish — they don't call a group of them a school for nothing. Researchers found that when 2 fish swim together, they make better decisions than when 2 fish are swimming alone.
The mishaps mean federal scientists need to "take a hard look" at all federal research on deadly pathogens and make sure, in each case, that the benefits justify risks, says Dr. Tom Frieden.
The traditional Japanese art of folding paper is now adding grace and ease to the deployment of fragile solar panels, seismometers and other vital instruments in outer space.
The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that parents begin reading to their children early, even to newborns. Professor Susan Neuman, an expert on early literacy development, explains.
On Titan, summer is almost three years away. But in a dark, placid ocean of natural gas, scientists have spotted something that could be the first inkling of springtime.
The U.S. doesn't routinely use the metric system. The U.S. government definition of a foot is 0.3048 meters. But if the length of a foot is based on the meter, what's the length of the meter based on?
Starting this fall, 25 percent of all U.S. hospitals — those with the worst records for infections and injuries — will lose 1 percent of every Medicare payment for a year.
We're surrounded by deception: in politics and pop culture, in the workplace and on social media. Pamela Meyer points out manners and cues that can help us suss out a lie.
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