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Science: Episodes

NASA says it plans to replace the digital countdown timer that's featured prominently in broadcasts and images of Kennedy Space Center launches ever since the second moon landing mission 45 years ago.
For the first time, scientists are reporting that human embryonic stem cells may be helping treat patients — in one instance, the cells seem to been enabling some blind people to see better.
Cells derived from embryos appear to have improved vision in more than half of the 18 patients who had become legally blind because of two progressive, currently incurable eye diseases.
Most of the noise created by natural gas development is temporary. After drilling and fracking, the workers and equipment are gone. But compressor stations can stay noisy for years — even decades.
Women's voices are often criticized, especially at work. We're called "shrill," told we "lack authority." Here's t<em></em>he story of two women who changed their voices in a quest to be heard.
Starting Wednesday, six "astronauts" will live in a geodesic dome on a remote volcanic outcrop in an eight-month simulation of a Mars mission. Robert Siegel talks to commander Martha Lenio.
Jennifer Doudna used to worry that her science wasn't doing anything important. Then some basic research led her team to a discovery that could one day be crucial in healing some genetic diseases.
Heads of state from well over 100 countries came to New York City this week to find ways to slow climate change. The summit is a dry run for a meeting next year to draft a treaty on global warming.
The World Health Organization warns of more than 20,000 cases by early November if help doesn't arrive quickly in West Africa. The CDC projects 1.4 million cases by late January.
"There is such a thing as being too late," President Obama says in his address to the U.N. Climate Summit. The White House is touting tools to boost "global resilience" in the face of climate change.
India's Mars Orbiter Mission is set to reach Mars on Wednesday, just days after a U.S. NASA probe began its orbit around the Red Planet. The difference? India did it on a much tighter budget.
Donors like being part of a recovery story. It's hard to tell that kind of story about Ebola.
NASA's MAVEN spacecraft on Sunday night fired its six main rocket engines for 33 minutes. That slowed the probe down enough so it could be captured by the Red Planet's gravity.
It's not violence on the job that makes some pro football players beat their wives or children, psychologists say. It's often childhood experience, fanned by a culture that accepts such behavior.
Angela Stimpson donated a kidney to a complete stranger. Why did she do it? Researchers found that the brains of Stimpson and other altruists are sensitive to fear and distress in a stranger's face.
Scientists hope NASA's MAVEN probe, which went into orbit Sunday night, will provide insight into why the Martian climate changed drastically billions of years ago.
The People's Climate March was timed to draw the notice of world leaders gathering for this week's U.N. Climate Summit in New York.
The answer, this time, isn't simply more cash, says Dr. Harold Varmus, director of the National Cancer Institute. Instead, changing the way research money is distributed might fix systemic problems.
On Tuesday, President Obama announced that the U.S. will send more military personnel and resources to Africa to fight the deadly virus.
Tired of waiting for a cure for breast cancer, a coalition of activists now leans hard on Congress to steer money to particular research projects. Critics say that approach may miss promising leads.
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