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Science: Episodes

Weekend Edition staff have been picking their favorite interviews from 2014. Editor Natalie Winston talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about an interview with an evangelical Christian climate scientist.
NPR's Rachel Martin takes a moment to talk about a new fish discovered in one of the deepest places on Earth.
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered a link between what you taste and what you hear.
Inspired by the snails' spiky shells and acid-loving nature, researchers named the new species <em>Alviniconcha strummeri</em>, after Clash frontman Joe Strummer.
In San Francisco Bay, researchers are using new technology to investigate shipwrecks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with James Delgado, director of Maritime Heritage at NOAA, about what they've found.
From monkeys to microbes, TED speakers in this playlist cover all different realms of the scientific world.
Psychologist Daniel Goleman, author of <em>Emotional Intelligence</em>, examines why we aren't more compassionate more of the time.
Author Robert Wright says humans are not simply wired to be compassionate — we have evolved to feel compassion out of self-interest.
Marine scientists plumbing the deepest part of the ocean sent microphones and collection probes baited with chicken to the bottom of a trench near Guam. Now they watch, wait ... and listen.
The new vehicle, named Orion, is designed to carry humans into deep space. But most Americans aren't aware it exists.
An experiment in Chicago randomly assigned train and bus riders to either talk to the stranger next to them or commute quietly. The result? Even for introverts, silence leaves you sadder.
An OPEC meeting last week sent oil prices tumbling when the cartel decided not to restrict production to boost prices. Now some are predicting parts of the U.S. will see gas prices under $2 a gallon.
A recent National Geographic article looks at toxic waste sites in the U.S. and the more than 49 million Americans who live near them. NPR's Eric Westervelt talks with writer Paul Voosen about his piece.
Between 1981 and 2012, 1 million extra twins were born in the U.S. One economist says all of those twins could be hurting the economy — but another expert points out some perks of twinhood.
For decades, a rare collection of human remains sat in a basement closet at the University of Texas. A new book tells the story of that collection — and the enduring mysteries that surround it.
Dogs pay close attention to the emotion in our voices, but what about the meaning of words? A clever experiment with 250 canines shows that dogs understand more of our speech than previously thought.
New research into the nature of intractable political conflicts might shed some light on how to address the perennial arguments that break out across Thanksgiving tables.
Lab scientists are trying to understand why some corpses buried in northwestern Poland were singled out for special anti-vampire treatments, such as putting a sickle around the neck.
Public health groups say lower levels will benefit people who suffer from asthma or other respiratory illnesses. Business groups say it's another expensive hoop to jump through.
A new study looks at the future of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and finds that by the end of this century, the region might be ice-free for 2 to 5 months, something that puts bears in grave peril.
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