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Economy: Episodes

Greece managed to make a $494 million debt payment to the International Monetary Fund Thursday, despite a precarious financial situation that had many speculating it would fail to do so. The problem for Greece is that there are several more deadlines on the horizon.
The Shanghai exchange is on a tear, but there could be trouble ahead for ill-informed investors. Analysts say the current upswing is driven by perceptions rather than fundamentals.
Montana could soon dial back laws that allowed defaulters to have their professional and driver's licenses revoked after failing to pay back debt.
High-end sweatpants are becoming a staple in an increasing number of men's wardrobes. It's part of a global fashion trend called "athleisure," where gym clothes find their way out of the workout room.
Lots of young adults are using apps like Venmo to settle all kinds of debts. As the apps get more popular, they've become targets for scammers and hackers. But that hasn't seemed to scare away users.
David Greene talks to Andrew McCutchen, centerfielder for the Pittsburgh Pirates, about the future of baseball in America's inner cities.
Financial advisers advocate using cash whenever possible. New technologies make it easier to do just the opposite. Still, a recent study shows more millennials are turning away from plastic.
A teacher, a student and an entrepreneur say the economic and social crisis in Athens has forced them to re-calibrate their expectations.
The NYPD is denying allegations that officers were forced to make a certain number of warrantless stops, and faced retaliation from superiors when they didn't.
Some big U.S. employers are giving their lowest-paid employees a raise. That's helped make low-wage workers one of the few segments of the workforce seeing an increase in pay.
Over the past year, the economy had added more than 200,000 jobs each month. That streak broke in the most recent report, as growth dipped to just 126,000 jobs — fewer than economists had anticipated.
Wal-Mart has long been criticized for low pay and erratic work schedules. So when the retailer arrives in a community, it stirs controversy — but it also brings jobs and low prices.
The nation's largest retailer is known for sprawling suburban and rural stores. Now Wal-Mart is moving into city centers — sometimes despite strong local opposition.
Greeks don't trust their own state to give them good services, so for decades they have evaded taxes.
Many Americans now have access to a commingled recycling system, which lets users mix plastic, glass, paper and metal together in one bin. It's much easier, but not nearly as efficient.
In Washington on Tuesday, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen delivered an upbeat assessment of the U.S. economy to members of the Senate Banking Committee.
Work has resumed at West Coast ports after nearly nine months of slow downs and work stoppages. Despite last week's tentative labor agreement, it could take months to get things back to normal.
A levee project would cordon off lucrative farmland along the Mississippi River in southeastern Missouri. But towns in Illinois say that puts them at risk of flooding while protecting rich farmers.
Oklahoma oil is expensive to produce, so the sharp drop in prices has forced many drilling companies to cut jobs. If prices stay low, the pain could spread to the banks that finance the oil industry.
Once a booming timber area, Grays Harbor County is the site of three proposed oil terminals. The local fishing industry sees the uptick in oil movement as a big risk, with limited economic benefits.
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