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Economy: Episodes

In Washington on Tuesday, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen delivered an upbeat assessment of the U.S. economy to members of the Senate Banking Committee.
Work has resumed at West Coast ports after nearly nine months of slow downs and work stoppages. Despite last week's tentative labor agreement, it could take months to get things back to normal.
A levee project would cordon off lucrative farmland along the Mississippi River in southeastern Missouri. But towns in Illinois say that puts them at risk of flooding while protecting rich farmers.
Oklahoma oil is expensive to produce, so the sharp drop in prices has forced many drilling companies to cut jobs. If prices stay low, the pain could spread to the banks that finance the oil industry.
Once a booming timber area, Grays Harbor County is the site of three proposed oil terminals. The local fishing industry sees the uptick in oil movement as a big risk, with limited economic benefits.
The White House is concerned Americans are losing billions of dollars to advisers who aren't acting in their interest. But the problem with retirement saving goes far beyond fees.
The White House says President Obama on Monday will direct the Department of Labor to craft new rules to require financial advisers to put their clients' interests ahead of their own.
For most of U.S. history, there was no minimum wage. Politicians passed laws tiptoeing toward one. But the Supreme Court struck those laws down. We look at how the U.S. finally got a minimum wage.
Global shipping companies are looking for other seaports to unload their goods, including those in Canada and along the East Coast of the U.S.
Oil companies are laying off thousands of workers, and firms that provide services to support the industry — from drilling to seismic surveys — have been told they must slash costs to keep working.
Around 500,000 Wal-Mart employees will soon be getting a raise. The company said on Thursday it would spend $1 billion to make sure all employees earn at least $9 an hour starting in April. Wal-Mart's minimum wage would go to $10 an hour in early 2016.
A labor dispute between shipping lines and dock workers has created big cargo backups at many West Coast ports. The slowdown is touching nearly every part of the nation's consumer economy.
Conventional wisdom is that income inequality has gotten worse in the years since the financial crisis, but new research by a George Washington University professor says that's not what the data show.
The housing market and the economy are both well on their way back from the Great Recession. But housing advocates say banks, stung by the housing crisis and its fallout, remain reluctant to lend.
Many Iranians seem prepared to shift relations with the West. But there are also plenty of skeptics when it comes to the prospect of a nuclear deal and normal ties with the U.S.
Oil is big business in Oklahoma, and the industry has been a boon for many cities here. But there are concerns that techniques used for extracting oil are behind a surge in temblors in the state.
No cargo will go in or out of 29 West Coast ports this weekend because of a labor dispute that has been dragging on for months. And now the economic impacts of the shutdown are starting to be felt.
Valentines Day is this one day when one product — a red rose — is worth two or three times more than it is at any other time of the year. If a florist catches that window, he's golden. But the process of getting the roses to is fraught with risk, middlemen, crazy expense and bad weather.
As the economy improves, political debates change. President Obama says it's time to focus on stagnant middle-class incomes. Republicans are trying to come up with their agenda for the middle class.
American firms have about $2 trillion in overseas accounts — money they could be using to hire workers and pay dividends in the U.S. The president wants to encourage them to bring that money home.
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