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Business Story of the Day: Episodes

Amid record production, some analysts worry the U.S. will run out of places to put it all. One says lack of storage space could drive oil down to around $20 a barrel, less than half the current price.
Last week,<em> Morning Edition</em> aired a piece about right-to-work laws in Kentucky. To clarify some assertions made in the piece, Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, of the Brookings Institution.
A riot at a private immigration prison in Willacy County, Texas, forced officials to close the facility and relocate 2,800 inmates. But it also left the county with a $2.3 million budget shortfall.
Frederick Hutson disrupted the biggest captive market in America. While in prison, he honed a business plan and re-imagined that system as an untapped consumer base.
A conviction can be fatal for a big company. So in some cases prosecutors have been holding off on punishing firms that have broken the law. In return, the companies vow to clean up their act.
Germany, which has backed most of the bailout loans to Greece, wants Greeks to stick to austerity measures. The new Greek government says austerity has destroyed the economy.
Chanel says it is aligning the cost of its handbags worldwide. The move reacts to the depreciating euro and aims to stop people from buying up the classic bags to sell at a profit in other countries.
The length of the average car loan isn't just creeping up, it's leaping up. Nearly 40 percent of people secure car loans that take more than five years to pay off. The trend has some analysts alarmed.
The price of oil has plummeted as a glut of crude sits idle in tankers and in storage. And more oil could be on the way if a nuclear deal removes the caps on Iranian oil exports.
Public passion is all well and good, but it will take more than big talk to get to Mars by 2025, space specialists say. Even several rockets' worth of cash won't easily solve the technical challenges.
The developer was known for well-crafted tract homes that dotted California suburbs after World War II. "The architecture really does inform the way you live," says Eichler homeowner Adriene Biondo.
The top college basketball teams face off next week in the NCAA tournament. And, a panel of judges will hear arguments over whether colleges should be allowed to pay basketball and football players.
With memories of the massive BP spill still fresh, residents are hoping to stop offshore drilling and underwater seismic testing. Industry leaders say they follow rules meant to protect wildlife.
The price of copper is down 40 percent from four years ago. Arizona residents from smaller mining towns worry about job losses, but some companies are planning to expand in the state.
Oil production appears to be churning right along in Sidney. But leaders are bracing for a whole lot less oil tax revenue to pay for services that are stretched thin.
Kansas City boasts one of the fastest, most competitive Internet service markets. But people are still trying to figure out what to do with all that speed — and some neighborhoods aren't being served.
Injured workers dependent on workers' compensation face eroding benefits. We go to Alabama and Georgia, where the value of an amputated arm can vary by $700,000, depending on which state you live in.
Over the past decade, states have slashed workers' compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers.
Cheaper gasoline has benefited millions of motorists around the U.S. But in Houston the downturn in prices has brought layoffs and could hurt other sectors, including finance and real estate.
The unemployment rate in Lincoln, Neb., is one of lowest in the U.S., thanks to a well-educated workforce. The focus now is on finding workers and keeping young people from leaving.
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