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NPR Topics: Business Story of the Day Podcast: Episodes

In his goodbye speech, James Kidney said the SEC didn't do enough to take down Wall Street during the Great Recession. David Greene talks to Kidney about his candid speech and his years at the SEC.
What's the etiquette around using your laptop in public? If you stop for lunch at the August First Bakery in Burlington, Vt., keep your computer in your bag. The cafe is banning screens.
As a new tornado season begins, Illinois officials say they need more help from the federal government, and Sens. Kirk and Durbin have reintroduced a bill proposing changes to the disaster formula.
A study shows that women can be great negotiators, just not when they're asking for themselves. When women negotiate pay on behalf of a friend, they bargain just as hard as the guys.
Re/code is a new tech site that doesn't charge its readers or expect to make much from ads. Instead, it has a successful conference business. Other media also see potential profits in conferences.
Watching a great gamer is like watching a tennis or baseball pro: "If they're really good then you can watch and learn," says Megu Kobayashi, who watches gamers on a site called Twitch.
There is still be a huge number of people who have been out of work for six months or more. Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution.
It has been nearly 2 months since a metal stormwater pipe ruptured near the Dan River. A federal criminal probe was launched into the relationship between Duke Energy and a state environmental agency.
Credit card data breaches get a lot of attention, but payroll system data breaches can have even more damaging effects.
Steve Inskeep talks to Gary Silverman of the <em>Financial Times</em> about a real estate fraud scheme that helped make Bakersfield, Calif., one of the home foreclosure capitals of the country.
When a school hires its own students, it can bump up its ranking. One school employs 20 percent of its most recent graduates — and jumped nine spots in the rankings this year.
The decision still must be approved by the full NLRB board in Washington, D.C. The regional director ruled football players at Northwestern qualify as employees and may therefore unionize.
Thanks to fracking, there is an abundance of natural gas at about a quarter of the European price. This influx of business may be good for the U.S., but it's cause for concern for European leaders.
Alibaba handles more transactions than Amazon and eBay combined. What does Alibaba do, and why has it chosen to list its shares in New York rather than Hong Kong?
The U.S. has more high-tech jobs open than it can fill. The problem is many of these programs cost tens of thousands of dollars which makes them out of reach for folks who are out of work.
The Pentagon's Defense Department Research Agency — DARPA — is pushing to build a semi-autonomous search and rescue robot. But scientists see obvious dual uses, for war.
The latest drought has revived questions about the viability of farming in Nevada desert. While some farmers have given up, others are experimenting with crops like grapes that require less water.
Community colleges and trade schools are trying to better prepare students for a global market. And some are looking to Europe for answers.
Silicon Valley companies have launched a drive to provide citizenship services on-site to employees holding green cards. The belief is that such employees become more valuable workers.
Alibaba, known as the Chinese Google, announced plans for an initial public offering in the U.S. The IPO could be one of the biggest in the tech sector's history, but investing could bring risks.
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