Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

Documentaries: Episodes

Vietnamese now cross in their thousands to visit Cambodian border casinos. Ed Butler reports on (some of) the darker aspects of Cambodia’s gambling boom.
Tracing the history of the modern Arab world through some of the great political dreams that have shaped it, from the 19th Century to the Arab Spring. In part two of The Making of the Arab World, Egyptian author Tarek Osman explores the rise and fall of Arab nationalism.
Lu Olkowski reports on New York's growing 'prepper' movement - people who are fearful of the future and who are preparing for the next disaster that will strike the city. They train in self-defence, plan ways to escape, store food and water in their houses and have 'bug out' bags ready at a moments notice ...
How Manchester helped shape the modern age. Communism, free trade, the co-operative movement, the campaign for female suffrage, European vegetarianism and trade unionism all originated or - crucially - were developed in the northern UK city.
Can a unique friendship between two men of god end the killings in the Central African Republic? Tim Whewell investigates.
The history of the Arab world, including Egypt's 19th Century encounters with Europe and the cultural renaissance known as Nahda.
How does being on a map affect your work, education and rights? Meet the The volunteers who are mapping the world's unmapped places and people - in the aftermath of natural disasters, and in areas of political unrest and civil war.
The story of Capt Mbaye Diagne, one of the unsung heroes of Rwanda’s genocide. Working as a Senegalese UN peacekeeper, he saved the children of murdered Hutu Prime Minister Agathe Uwilingiyimana and many more. Mark Doyle travels to Rwanda, Senegal and Canada to meet the people who knew Mbaye Diagne.
How can an airplane go missing in the 21st Century and why - nearly a month after it disappeared - we are apparently no nearer to solving the mystery of what happened to flight MH370?
Lucy Ash talks to the Ukrainian volunteers and activists who are painstakingly restoring a stash of documents dumped in a lake on the abandoned estate of ex-president Yanukovich.
Hacking, security, encryption: Gordon Corera explores the history of the war between governments and geeks to control computer cryptography.
Mustapha Mohammed meets Nigerian boys who have to work to support their families in the northern city of Kano. It's a heavy burden for them, and they pay a high personal price.
In 1983 at the height of the deprivations and repression of Nicolae Ceausescu's communist regime in Romania, a man called Ion Bugan made a solitary protest against the system. His daughter, the poet and writer Carmen Bugan, describes what happened next.
Each year, thousands of Latin American migrants illegally cross the US border via a treacherous journey, walking for days across the Arizona desert. Some succeed, others are deported, while many drop dead from exhaustion. The BBC's Mexico Correspondent Will Grant travels to Tucson, Arizona, to meet the ...
More gun deaths are due to suicide than homicide in the US. But what happens to the fiancée left behind, to friends and to the law enforcement officers involved? And, in the wake of the Clackamas mall shooting, we hear from people about their fear of violence, rational or not, that drives the fierce ...
Tim Whewell travels to the Turkish border and to Lebanon to talk to the doctors and health care workers struggling to cope with a growing crisis.
Monica Vasconcelos reports that fifty years after the coup, Brazil has started to deal with the legacy of the military dictatorship. But why are some people still afraid?
Under apartheid in South Africa, stand-up comedy was exclusively the domain of white performers. But now comics like David Kau and Riaad Moosa are challenging that dominance with their witty takes on the complexities and divides of their society.
Young women lack the same opportunities as men, despite most countries legislating against discrimination. What is standing in the way of girls achieving equality?
The BBC’s Valeria Perasso is on the US border, exploring the journey taken by Mexican deportees as they pass through the security fence, back home.
Please wait...