Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

Deconstructing Comics » Podcast: Episodes

In May, comics creator and educator Ben Towle wrote a post on his blog entitled “Let’s Stop Using Film Terminology to Talk About Comics,” in which he suggested that using terms like “camera angle” and “shot” to describe comics storytelling may prevent creators ...
This week, Tim talks with two women who are mixing Japanese and Western influences in their comics! First, Ana Moreno, former US Marine and writer of Marine Corps Yumi, drawn in a gag-manga style by Takeshi Nogami. A gag manga about joining the Marines?! (available in both English and Japanese) Then, ...
You may have been vaguely aware that a number of non-Japanese are drawing very manga-esque comics that are published in English only. They’re known as Original English Language (or “OEL”) manga, and many of them are published by Seven Seas Entertainment. Is this an area of comics worth exploring? ...
FLASHBACK! Though Asterios Polyp made the point that comics and (written) music are similar, doing a comic about music is not such an easy task. But Reinhard Kleist beautifully presents the music, and life, of a country music legend in Johnny Cash: I See a Darkness, recently released in English. How ...
If you’re into American comics at all, you undoubtedly know how Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko and others changed the industry with their work in the 1960s, and set the template for kinds of stories Marvel still publishes today. That’s just part of the story that Sean Howe researched for ...
FLASHBACK! At a panel at San Diego Comicon 2011, Dan DiDio (bottom picture at left) caused a stir by seeming belligerent when a fan asked why the DC reboot included fewer female creators — even fewer than had worked on for DC pre-reboot. DiDio seemed to think there were hardly any female comics ...
Just because a story is full of tropes doesn’t mean it’s bad. Consider Demon Archives, by Daniel Sharp and Sebastian Piriz. Postapocalyptic future? Check. Members of a troop being picked off one by one, by an unknown enemy? Check. A.I. who may or may not be on the heroes’ side? Check. ...
Tim came back from his Tim Across America trip with an assortment of comics, including a couple from the New York Aspiring Comics Creators Club, and trove of self-published books that he bought at Isotope Comics, including one about a feline pirate captain. This week, he and Mulele read through those ...
Tim talks with the members of Studio Revolver in Atlanta, some of whom are have done work for Cartoon Network and storyboarded TV commercials. Not beginners, these are folks who are accomplished and in demand. So why’d they decide to make their own Web comics? Isn’t that how artists try to ...
Chris Ware’s 2012 work Building Stories attracted a lot of attention because of its unusual format: a box of 14 publications of varying shapes and sizes, which can be read in any order. Ware says the work is about memory, in various ways, and reading the story in various non-chronological ways ...
Having grown up with feet planted firmly on both sides of the Pacific, Aya Rothwell has always been observant of cultural differences, and this shows up in her comics. Who else would do a comic about a human visitor to an alien world, with the biggest conflict being that the human keeps getting the aliens’ ...
A slimy gambler goes up against the Devil, betting his soul vs. half the money in the world. Score! He’s then approached by some people who promise him a great reward if he funds their plans. He joins them, going up against (and beating) the hapless Devil repeatedly. It’s hard not to have ...
It’s been a long time coming, but a fair number of teachers in mainstream American education are finally recognizing that what the comics medium brings to the table can be just as meaty and challenging as the best prose novels. This week we meet Juan Mah y Busch, an Associate Professor at Loyola ...
This week, the comic that shows there’s definitely an “I” in “Immune system”! In Biowars, the body’s defenses against disease appear as egotistical, infighting super heroes. And… very nice art, and… Hmm, something missing here. Tim and Mulele give this ...
Jules Feiffer’s Sick Sick Sick began appearing in the Village Voice in 1956, satirizing both the kinds of people he met in New York, and politicians and the military-industrial complex. Feiffer remains a highly influential creator, with a new graphic novel coming out later this year. Tom Spurgeon, ...
Irya is a boy in a unidentified country. His brother has just left, saying he’s going to “farm”. Then, Irya moves rocks by telekinesis. Wait, what? Tim and Mulele discuss Bits Fair, a Web comic that’s basically good, but could use some tweaking — in terms of the writing, ...
While the phrase “’90s comics” tends to elicit some eyerolls nowadays — Foil covers! X-men with huge guns and lots of pouches! — there was still some good comics work done in that era. What was it like to be in the business back then? Joe St.Pierre drew some Spider-man Clone ...
There are numerous ways in which you may have encountered Ted Rall‘s work. In addition to his political cartoons, he’s taken on a variety of other formats and other media: comics journalism (in central Asia, including Afghanistan), newspaper columns, radio, graphic novels, and MAD Magazine ...
Nearly three months ago, way back before “Tim Across America,” Kumar and Dana discussed Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s classic graphic novel “From Hell.” Now they’re back with a discussion of last year’s From Hell Companion, which includes an annotated script ...
In a special bonus episode, we check out a few remaining tidbits from Tim Across America’s final state, California! First, Stephenny Godfrey recalls the events that inspired her comics “Panorama” and “Two Buses”, leading Dale Wilson to try to top that story with another, ...
Please wait...