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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

It has been another bad week for bankers with new developments in American investigations into interest rate manipulation and sanctions busting with Iran. Is this a sign of cultural problems in the industry and if so can they be fixed? Andrew Walker talks to Philip Augar, a former investment banker who ...
Kenya's trade minister talks about the effort the government is making to improve the investment climate. He tells us he will tackle corruption head on. And one Kenyan investor who has spent three decades away from his home country likes the changes he has seen so much that he is now willing to put his ...
The American property market shows some tentative signs of life, but even if it really is recovering, the human misery caused by the crash will last for years. And the reputation of credit rating agencies has been damaged by the crises in US housing and the Eurozone - is it time for a publicly funded ...
Business Daily comes from Finland, the eurozone's most northerly country and one where there is resentment about the bailouts of struggling nations such as Greece. Some wonder whether the euro is worth it. But the governing coalition insists that Finland is committed to the euro.
What will be the benefits of London 2012 for poor communities around the Olympic Park? And, why Greek businesses fear the prospect of an exit from the euro. Plus - the joy of upholstery: Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times discovers the attractions of manual work.
US trading company Knight Capital has been rescued, after being brought to the edge of bankruptcy by a computer glitch. The errors may be small in themselves, but the repercussions of automated trading may be enormous. Are we going to move into a world where, loosely, robots are in control of our stockmarkets?
And ...
With the main Olympic events concluding this weekend, we tally the profit and the loss in Business Daily; whether it's for gold-medal athletes or for the hosts, and ask - where did all the tourists go?
Are the makers of Biofuels undermining that most crucial resource: the global food supply? We debate the issues. And a Chinese internet company seeking global recognition via its Olympics coverage. And our regular Kenyan commentator looks at how the rising trade between Africa and China has also spurred ...
Could glitches in automated share-trading threaten financial stability? After a spate of recent technical problems on stockmarkets, some argue regulators should slow down the high-speed trading which uses artificial intelligence in trading systems. Plus - what corporate sponsors can hope to get out of ...
UK bank Standard Chartered denies US claims that it was a 'rogue institution' in its dealings with companies linked to Iran. Lesley Curwen talks to David Green, formerly of the UK's regulator, the Financial Services Authority. And how Olympics host cities should approach the many risks involved in holding ...
Did strong eurozone nations like Germany help cause the crisis by lending too much to the weak ones? And we hear about a blood test that may show whether cancer might develop - long before any tumours are present. Plus what do management consultants and buffaloes have in common? Answer: they both charge a lot.
At least 21 trillion dollars of untaxed private wealth was invested in global tax havens in 2010, according to a report from the Tax Justice Network. Lesley Curwen and her guests debate how much money the developing world is missing out on because of tax cheats.
And after the massive power cuts ...
Just months after the fall of the Gaddafi regime, what hope for Libya, plagued by years of corruption and misrule? Also what hope for Hillary Clinton, aiming to drum up US trade in Africa?
As the rich world struggles with climbing unemployment, Business Daily look at the jobless challenge from the applicant's perspective - whether it's the American worker told he's simply not got the skills or to the Chinese graduate deemed too smart for the job. Is it actually businesses who are sometimes ...
Why Italy is crucial to the survival of the eurozone. And - the Indian inventor who tested his own sanitary pads, using a football, a tube and animal blood. Plus technology commentator Jeremy Wagstaff wonders how he can keep his online friends separate from his online business contacts.
It's another big week for the eurozone - so what would it take to save the currency? And as Bangladesh becomes an increasingly successful exporter we hear about the challenges for the country's leading port. Plus - how some people in tech savvy Japan still love a way of communicating that you might have ...
The climate change policies of America's biggest oil company, Exxon Mobil. Plus how Olympic sponsors are protected by a UK Act of Parliament. And Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times presents a jaundiced view of the London Olympics, and workers' attitudes to Olympic transport disruption.
The clouds are gathering - again - over the economies of the developed world. Can the emerging nations come to the rescue? Or should we be looking for salvation from cutting edge industries? Perhaps events like the Olympics can give a confidence boost to get us out of the starting blocks. This week In ...
The pipeline thieves snatching a billion dollars a month from Nigeria's crude oil pipelines, and those other crooks who are capturing entire governments: is the crisis fuelling a global crime wave?
In Business Daily today, oiling the wheels of sport. As the Olympics juggernaut starts to roll, we find out what it really costs to get your national athlete onto the winning podium. Plus there are now more fans of American basketball in China, than there are Americans. We hear about China's hoop dreams ...
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