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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Should the International Monetary Fund be bankrolling Europe? The organisation's former Chief Economist, Ken Rogoff, talks to Business Daily's Ed Butler. And the BBC's Economics Editor Stephanie Flanders reports from Japan on why the country's "lost decade" could provide lessons for Europe's troubled economies.
The cost of food may be easing off in some parts of the world - but it's still a problem in Kenya. The BBC's Kevin Mwachiro speaks to a mother in Nairobi about how she's coping with rising prices. And Lesley Curwen finds out from the UN's Representative on Food Security just how it is dealing with the ...
The threat of sanctions against Iran has been pushing up the global oil price. But it has also been having an impact beyond its borders. Katy Watson reports from Dubai on how many Iranian businesses are suffering as a result. And has Google lost its way? Technology commentator Jeremy Wagstaff explores ...
Downgrades and a deadlock in bondholders' talks - how bad has the eurozone crisis got? Lesley Curwen asks Geoff Kendrik, Head of European Foreign Exchange Strategy at Nomura Bank. Public sector workers in countries across the world are seeing cuts in their pay and perks, but not in the oil-rich Gulf. ...
Why do people get so angry about high rates of excecutive pay?
Hungary is going cap in hand to the IMF for a fresh bailout to prevent the country going bankrupt. Justin Rowlatt finds out why its problems are causing so much concern around Europe. And as America is the latest country to announce that it's overhauling its defence strategy and cutting back on spending, ...
As the boss of Apple is awarded a $378 million pay packet, Lesley Curwen examines executive pay. Do high salaries make people happy? And why do some of the world's richest want to give it all away?
Leaving the eurozone -- what might it really mean? We look at the fall out in the case of fictional country Gritaly. Irwin Collier, Director of the JF Kennedy Institute at the Free University of Berlin examines what happened in the early 90s, when East Germany's weak currency, the ostmark, was replaced ...
The Spanish government has ruled out the creation of a 'bad bank' to contain billions of dollars worth of debt. Lesley Curwen takes a look at who should be bearing the cost of sour bank loans. And the BBC's Mark Tully reports from Delhi on whether foreign supermarkets will ever be allowed in to India.
As French President Nicolas Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel meet in Berlin, Lesley Curwen asks how much of a loss Greek government bondholders should be forced to take. Even if they agree, will it be a solution for Greece? And we lift the lid on the world of Russian oligarchs - through a ...
Is the Chinese property market the next financial disaster waiting to happen? Justin Rowlatt hosts the BBC's lively new business and economics discussion programme.
Where should ordinary businesses invest when the chips are down? Mark Thomas from PA Consulting shares his ideas. As Nigeria cuts its fuel subsidies, doubling the cost of gasoline for people Justin Rowlatt asks economist Dr J. Atsu Amegashie from the University of Guelph in Canada and Professor Andrew ...
Today on Business Daily we have a unique story, an environmental battle that is actually being won. And what a battle! This is the battle to save the Amazon rainforest. For decades we've been told that the remorseless tide of destruction in the Amazon cannot be stopped. You will be surprised to discover ...
As the the Republican presidential nomination gets underway with the Iowa caucus Doug Holtz-Eakin, former chief economic policy adviser to U.S. Senator John McCain and economist Troy Davig at Barclays Capital discuss the main issue facing the US in 2012. Justin Rowlatt explores the eerie mask which has ...
Let's be honest, the economic outlook isn't good this year but that doesn't mean you should give up hope. Vanessa Rossi from Oxford Analystica joins Justin Rowlatt to look at the big economic trends facing the globe in 2012, while Tom Stevens, Investment Director at Fidelity talks about the opportunities ...
How do sponsors and taxpayers get good value for money when they pay for sports events? Lesley Curwen reports on one big sponsorship deal in round-the-world sailing. Plus, the political sensitivities around the legacy of the London 2012 Olympics. The BBC's Alan Urry reports.


And Lesley Curwen talks ...
Business Daily opens up the secrets of how to get rich from technology. Lesley Curwen reports from "Silicon Valley comes to Oxford". She talks to the event's founder, Mike Malone, about the outlook for the next few years and to Allen Morgan, a Silicon Valley investor who wants to lend the money for that ...
Anthropologists spend decades studying the culture and rituals of obscure tribes in Africa and the Amazon, but Dutch anthropologist Joris Luyendik tells Justin Rowlatt why he's decided to study bankers instead. Former trader Barbara Davis, turned novelist adds her insight into working in London's Square ...
Business Daily turns its attention to the biggest challenge facing humanity: tackling climate change. The entire world economy is built on fossil fuels, so how can we wean ourselves off them? We've got the world's leading energy consultant, a Californian trendspotter and a new technology that harnesses ...
Business Daily today will be finding out who has the real power in the workplace. Is it a company's Chief Executive, or their Personal Assistant? PA's are the gatekeeper to their bosses, know all about the organisation, and attract the attention of corporate gift companies, party venues, and more. Plus ...
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