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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

How will China tackle endemic corruption and rapidly growing inequality? Justin Rowlatt speaks to Gary Liu, the deputy director of Lujiazui International Finance Research Centre, and Jim O'Neil, Chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management. Plus Lucy Kellaway on whether our bosses should decide when we travel.
19
Mar
2012
17:31 mins
How will China tackle endemic corruption and rapidly growing inequality? Justin Rowlatt speaks to Gary Liu, the deputy director of Lujiazui International Finance Research Centre, and Jim O'Neil, Chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management. Plus Lucy Kellaway on whether our bosses should decide when we travel.
How to pursue austerity without damaging growth? It's the challenge of our times in many developed economies. The extent of spending cuts and tax rises in Greece has been endlessly debated, so too Spain, which in the past week fell out with Brussels over deficit reduction targets. So is there a sweet ...
Business Daily eases you into quantitative easing. Some of the most powerful central banks are doing it, but who are the winners and losers? Andrew Walker talks to Tim Leunig from the London School of Economics and Simon Ward, chief economist at the fund manager Henderson Global Investors. And how to ...
As oil prices push above a hundred and twenty dollars a barrel, are we going back to the 1970s - is the world is about to experience another oil crisis and what would would it mean for how we all live? Our correspondent Kaitlin Funaro has been to Palm Springs in California where taxes and environmental ...
Have the managers of hedge funds, not their clients, soaked up most of the industry's profits? Lesley Curwen talks to Simon Lack, author of 'The Hedge Fund Mirage' who argues that 98% of the profits from the industry have gone to the managers of hedge funds, and only 2% to its clients, which include ...
Internet giant Google has just changed its rules to allow information to be shared across all its services. But it isn't the only internet service busy farming your data. Justin Rowlatt discusses the intricacies of the internet privacy debate. Self-styled "digital hit man" Frank Ahern also gives his ...
One year on from the tsunami, is reconstruction money helping Japan's economy? BBC correspondent Mariko Oi reports from one of the towns devastated by the disaster and Lesley Curwen talks to Paul Hearn, chief executive of the Japanese bank Mizuho International. The BBC's economics correspondent Andrew ...
China's Premier Wen Jiabao announced that the target for China's economic growth was being cut for the first time in years. So is China, the world's second biggest economy, on the slide - given a background of regional debt troubles, a housing bubble, corruption and civil unrest? Or can China boost consumer ...
Many African, Asian and South American nations have vast reserves of natural resources. So why aren't they richer and why are they still reliant on foreign aid?
Will the eurozone's woes ever end? Arguably the bigger issue is the long term solution to Europe's problems - the presumption is that this will be achieved by what is known as "structural adjustment". But what does the term really mean - is it really all about making it easier to fire people? Justin ...
Has the US economy reached a turning point at a good time for President Barack Obama's re-election chances? Lesley Curwen asks Pippa Malmgren, former Special Assistant to President George W. Bush. And economist Lord Skidelsky discusses the controversial idea of a maximum working week of 20 hours. Plus ...
With hundreds of eurozone banks on life support, will there be another credit crisis? Lesley Curwen talks to Carsten Brzeski, senior economist at ING Belgium,who says the European Central Bank is crossing its fingers that the cheap loans it provides for banks will save the day.

And Janet Ecker, President ...
Is the rise of Greece's underground economy further damaging its state finances? The BBC's Mark Lowen reports from Athens on the culture of evading tax. And Lesley Curwen talks to Dr. Friedrich Schneider of Linz University in Austria, an expert on hidden economies who has advised the central banks of ...
In the Balance leaves the studio to broadcast from the City of London and reflect on the future of manufacturing. Do new developments in technology mean that manufacturing jobs will move from China, Germany and Japan back to countries where making things has been in decline? And looking ahead to the ...
Gold has been associated with wealth since the dawn of civilization. We ask what role it has to play on today's international markets. Nigel Dodd - a sociologist from the London School of Economics, considers whether the "goldbugs" are right, while Ross Norman of Sharps Pixley, London Bullion Brokers, ...
Business Daily looks at how the conflict in Syria could destroy the country's economy. We hear from a Syrian businessman who fled Homs for Cairo three months into the uprising, and from middle east analyst David Butter. Plus, Sun Baohong from the The Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business in Beijing ...
How much money does it take to be rich? We compare answers from Michelle Fleury in New York, Will Grant in Mexico City, and Rajini Vaidyanathan in Mumbai. Can businesses help to share out wealth more fairly? Joining that debate are Rachel Rhodes, of London Mining Company, Robert H Frank, economics professor ...
The Greek minister for tourism, Pavlos Yeroulanos, pleads for the nation's rescuers to put more focus on helping Greece towards growth and jobs. Plus, the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones reports from one of the world's biggest telecoms conferences, on how even the latest mobile is crippled ...
How can enterprise be encouraged in one of the poorest parts of the world? Justin Rowlatt reports from Freetown in Sierra Leone, and speaks to Juice bar owner Gladys England, to Manja Kargbo of the enterprise charity Afford, and Modupe Taylor-Pearce of Dragon Transport. He also asks Sheku Sambadeen Sesay, ...
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