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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Filling a bucket with no bottom: we consider the fears of some German politicians that Greece and Spain are now unsaveable. When do the eurozone prophecies of doom become self-fulfilling? Also: if you can't buy it, grow it. How Greeks are going back to the land.
Why do the regulators only flex their muscles when it's far too late - letting the party go with a swing during a boom, only to turn the music off only when the bust comes? And can anything be done about it? Business Daily also looks at why the Philippines is sending thousands of domestic workers to ...
After HSBC got into hot water over money laundering just how hard is it for the world's banks to spot dirty money. And the rainforest versus palm oil - the battle in the jungles of Borneo over Malaysia's plans to boost a valuable export. Plus: why small gaffes can spell big trouble in the modern high-tech office.
How can big companies be held to account by parliaments? Is it right for politicians to grill CEOs about the misdeeds of their companies,
or is it just public humiliation which stirs up anti-business sentiment, and doesn't actually change behaviour?
Plus our resident comedian Colm O'Regan brings us ...
There's a vacancy for the top job at Barclays. We interview an applicant who wants to revamp the industry. He's Paul Moore, a former whistleblower at rival London bank, HBOS. But should he be given the job or should it go to someone with no banking experience at all? Dr Amanda Goodall of the Cass Business ...
The euro back on our radar, as we look at the biggest potential casualty of them all - Italy - which this week saw its banks' credit ratings cut yet again, and the Prime Minister Mario Monti declaring Sicily effectively bankrupt. Plus, why bamboo could be the new miracle cash-crop.
Business Daily looks at two different costs of the economic crisis. With food prices volatile once again, we ask who's to blame? Is it governments? The climate? Or is it partly profiteering food companies? We hear from the CEOs of Nestle and Cargill and hear some of the criticisms from a food security ...
In the wake of the interest rate-rigging scandal at Barclays, questions are being asked about other markets where traders have a say in fixing prices, including the oil market. Lesley Curwen hears about the incentives and conflicts of interest which might lead traders to manipulate the figures they submit. ...
Two years after the Dodd Frank Act became law in the United States, Lesley Curwen talks to Congressman Barney Frank who helped to design it. He fiercely defends the regulation against criticism and condemns the LIBOR rate-rigging scandal. Plus Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times argues that blandness, ...
How can African countries make the most of their new oil finds? Or could the oil be a curse, if it brings corruption and environmental damage flying in its wake? Lesley Curwen's guests are Paul Adong Deng, Managing Director of Nile Petroleum Corporation, South Sudan's national oil company; Rolake Akinkugbe, ...
China's growth figures dip again. Has talk of the coming Chinese Century been premature? Also, is Facebook advertising all its cracked up to be. And just how rational are we?
We look at going it alone. Why Germany can't pay, won't pay, and needs - according to the former President of the Federal Association of German Industries, Professor Hans-Olef Henkel - to go its own way. Plus, why millions of people globally prefer a solitary life these days. What are the economic implications, ...
Does the experience of debt relief in Africa hold lessons for the eurozone? Lesley Curwen talks to Shanta Devarajan, chief economist for the Africa region at the World Bank. Plus, a family lawyer explains how recent banking regulation has made life harder for the ex-wives of bankers, women whose average ...
Europe's trade commissioner Karel de Gucht talks to Lesley Curwen about the potential trade war with China over rare earth minerals, plus whether Spain could be the next euro-domino to fall. He says it will not happen, because it would be 'illogical'. And - how to manage a team working on three different ...
US regulators are squaring up to companies like Google and Facebook over online privacy. And they are warning about the dangers of downloading applications on your smartphone. Lesley Curwen talks to America's privacy cop, David Vladeck, Director of the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the Federal Trade ...
Bob Diamond the boss of the global banking group, Barclays, resigned over the growing scandal of the rigging of a key interest rate...Libor. Mr Diamond who was given a grilling by British Members of Parliament - claimed other banks were guilty of doing it too. Up to 20 other international banks could ...
After two and a half years can the eurozone disaster still be described as a crisis? We explode the myth of decoupling - showing how the pernicious effects of Europe's troubles are now spreading across the world. And, the secrets of selling to China's elusive consumers.
What does the Libor scandal tell us about capitalism? We hear cures for its malaise and Justin Rowlatt meets the billionaire Wilbur Ross, who's made a fortune from failure.
Market rigging isn't the only problem with Libor. We speak to the man who led the Barclay's investigation on the problems with how the Libor rate is set. Plus, Barclay's bank hasn't only come in for criticism about its attempt to rig interest rates. It also came under fire from the British government ...
Are other banks implicated in the interest rate rigging scandal at Barclays? Lesley Curwen talks to the BBC's economics editor, Stephanie Flanders about the resignation of Barclays CEO, Bob Diamond and the other banks which may be involved. Former banker Will Hopper, author of 'The Puritan Gift' suggests ...
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