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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Business Daily opens up the secrets of how to get rich from technology. Lesley Curwen reports from "Silicon Valley comes to Oxford". She talks to the event's founder, Mike Malone, about the outlook for the next few years and to Allen Morgan, a Silicon Valley investor who wants to lend the money for that ...
Anthropologists spend decades studying the culture and rituals of obscure tribes in Africa and the Amazon, but Dutch anthropologist Joris Luyendik tells Justin Rowlatt why he's decided to study bankers instead. Former trader Barbara Davis, turned novelist adds her insight into working in London's Square ...
Business Daily turns its attention to the biggest challenge facing humanity: tackling climate change. The entire world economy is built on fossil fuels, so how can we wean ourselves off them? We've got the world's leading energy consultant, a Californian trendspotter and a new technology that harnesses ...
Business Daily today will be finding out who has the real power in the workplace. Is it a company's Chief Executive, or their Personal Assistant? PA's are the gatekeeper to their bosses, know all about the organisation, and attract the attention of corporate gift companies, party venues, and more. Plus ...
One and a half billion adults around the world are overweight or obese. As increasing numbers of us pile on the weight, we look at the business implications. American entrepreneur Scott Kramer tells Justin Rowlatt how he has spotted the potential for profit in the growing new market of products for ...
A starry lineup of guests - a former British finance minister, a former US presidential adviser and a former central banker - who all played a part in the lead up to where we are now, consider how bad things are, compared to the darkest days of 2008.
Does the latest wave of financial regulation make us safer? Lesley Curwen asks Gillian Tett, Assistant Editor of the Financial Times and lawyer Tim Strong from Taylor Wessing whether new rules imposed on banks are more effective than previous regulation. US investment adviser Jon Shayne talks about his ...
Across the world retirement ages are on the increase. America and Germany are heading for 67, Britain for 68. Our Berlin Correspondent Stephen Evans looks at the changes being made by employers to accommodate an older workforce. Justin Rowlatt speaks to headhunter Jeff Winter from Gravity People about ...
Can the dollar continue as the world's true reserve currency? US economist Barry Eichengreen tells Lesley Curwen why he believes the greenback is heading for decline. David Placek, the founder and president of Lexicon Branding, explains why a company's name can determine success. And Jeremy Wagstaff ...
Could India's army of scientists and engineers provide the fresh original innovation the world needs? Lesley Curwen asks Nirmalya Kumar, a professor at the London Business School whether India is still just processing ideas from elsewhere. Professor Rema Hanna from Harvard University looks at the environmental ...
Europe's leaders must have hoped that they would have a quiet Christmas but there is a growing fear that the sovereign debt crisis will precipitate a banking crisis. But how could that happen when the European Central Bank has promised unlimited support for Europe's banks? The BBC's Business Editor ...
We're asking some provocative questions about Germany - is it calling the economic shots in Europe and does that really make sense for the most endebted countries like Greece or Portugal? And what about France? We know what the French think of David Cameron but are they happy to be led by Angela Merkel ...
We're asking some provocative questions about Germany - is it calling the economic shots in Europe and does that really make sense for the most endebted countries like Greece or Portugal? And what about France? We know what the French think of David Cameron but are they happy to be led by Angela Merkel ...
Young people are now three times more likely to be out of work than older workers. The BBC's Karishma Vaswani reports on how young Indonesians are dealing with extremely high unemployment in Makassar. So what can be done? Justin Rowlatt asks Jose Manuel Salazar from the International Labour Organisation, ...
At last week's eurozone summit the delegates agreed upon a so-called fiscal "compact" rather than a fiscal union. Justin Rowlatt asks Malcolm Sawyer, a professor of Economics at the University of Leeds, what the difference is between a compact and a union and whether it matters. The BBC's Jonah Fisher ...
The bad luck of a generation whose working lives start in a recession. Lesley Curwen talks to Dr. John Goldthorpe of Nuffield College Oxford, who suggests the effects of early joblessness may be long-lasting. While Stephen Waller from Yorkshire talks about his own personal struggle to find work after ...
Why is money moving out of Greece and into strong economies such as Germany? Lesley Curwen speaks to Richard Werner, Professor of International Banking at Southampton University. While historian Norman Davies reflects on whether the eurozone could collapse as other empires have done in the past. Plus ...
Is inflation the only tool that can solve the eurozone's problems? Ken Rogoff the Harvard Economics professor who's built a career fighting inflation talks to Justin Rowlatt. Rob Young has been to Libya where the revolution may be over, but youth unemployment is the new challenge. And Lucy Kellaway ...
Is inflation the only tool that can solve the eurozone's problems? Ken Rogoff the Harvard Economics professor who's built a career fighting inflation talks to Justin Rowlatt. Rob Young has been to Libya where the revolution may be over, but youth unemployment is the new challenge. And Lucy Kellaway ...
Justin Rowlatt and his panel of guests consider whether austerity is curing the world's indebted nations or killing them off. That's In the Balance from the Business Daily team
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