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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Lesley Curwen reports from Washington on reaction to Christine Lagarde's selection as the new boss of the IMF. James Srodes asks if her new job is like being Captain of the Titanic? And Brazilian IMF Director, Paulo Nogueira Batista, criticises the selection process as "unbalanced".

Plus, Justin Rowlatt ...
As the Greeks struggle with austerity and the Americans with paying for stimulus, we ask which of them has the right formula for economic success.
Lesley Curwen speaks to Mark Weisbrot from the Washington based Center for Economic Policy and Research and John Makin, chief economist at the global hedge ...
This week the Greek parliament will vote on the latest austerity package. Manuela Saragosa reports from Athens on why so many Greeks continue to oppose the package, despite the huge stakes.
Plus, why don't bosses have any idea about their weaknesses? Our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway thinks she knows.
The new head of the IMF is about to be selected. Their appointment comes at a time when the IMF is playing a pivotal role in the world economy, but will they really be able to change anything?
Justin Rowlatt speaks to the BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker and former member of the executive ...
Could an element called Thorium solve the crisis of global warming? We'll be exploring the potential of a low carbon energy source which is also cheap, plentiful and safe.
Justin Rowlatt speaks to former businessman turned environmental campaigner John Durham and Ian Hore-Lacy from the World Nuclear Association.
Should Greece default on its debts and leave the euro? We hear of the sacrifices being made in Athens and the voices calling for an end to the cuts.
Plus a briefing on everything you need to know about Greece and the euro. Business Daily answers your questions.
A European central banker warns that debt worries could spark another global financial crisis.
Plus, if Taiwan were to bind its economy to China's what are the pros and the cons?
Lesley Curwen speaks to Erkki Liikanen, a member of the ECBs Governing Council, and Professor John Quelch, Dean of the China ...
Eurozone finance ministers made the latest loan to Greece conditional on new austerity measures, but virtually no one thinks Greece will ever pay back all its debts.
And a surprisingly confident view on Europe's prospects from China.
Justin Rowlatt speaks to Dr Andrew Lilico, of Europe Economics and ...
Greece's debt drama has been unfolding for 18 months now, so why does it still have the power to cause turmoil in the markets? Surely everyone has already factored in the risk of default? Plus, Business Daily drinks some Georgian wine and asks why Russian railways are a different width from the rest of the world.
For decades America has been the world's supreme economic and military power. Business Daily asks the chief economist at Citigroup whether the era of American supremacy is coming to an end. Plus, how the rural poor can get electricity without increasing greenhouse gas emissions and why traffic jams ...
On Business Daily we discover what living in one of the most expensive cities on earth is like and we'll be exploring the hidden world of the most powerful political machine on the planet - the Chinese Communist Party.
Chris Hogg reports from China and Justin Rowlatt speaks to Richard McGregor of the ...
We take a hard look at some of the accepted wisdom about Asia. Does the 21st century really belong to Asia and is its model of economic growth a roaring success? Lesley Curwen speaks to George Magnus, senior economic advisor at the Swiss bank UBS and Chandran Nair, founder of the Global Institute for ...
As Asia's appetite for energy grows, India's solution is to build more nuclear power plants. Is that the right answer? And we hear about controversial research showing the health risks of nuclear power are lower than those of fossil fuels.
Plus, the hurdles facing the latest contender for the IMF's top ...
As America warns that cyber attacks could constitute an act of war David Willis is in California to discuss the economic implications of computer sabotage. Where does the threat come from and what are the solutions? He speaks to Richard Marshall, the director of Global Cyber Security at the U.S. Department ...
Could there be last-minute candidates in the race for the top job at the IMF?
Lesley Curwen talks to South Africa's finance minister Pravin Gordhan who says his government is still considering whether to nominate his predecessor, Trevor Manuel.
Plus the BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports ...
Is it right to make money out of microfinance? We ask Vikram Akula of SKS. Plus, a report on what is holding back Egypt's economy and an Irish comedian's view of the IMF.
Does financial lobbying threaten the regulation that could prevent another meltdown? Plus, did the force of momentum help create the financial crisis, and does the IMF understand Asia?
Is this the beginning of the end of the Eurozone's debt crisis? Justin Rowlatt speaks to Professor Iain Begg.
And should all insider trading really be considered a crime? We get the views of Professor Robert McGee and Jacob Frenkel, a former federal prosecutor. Plus our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway ...
In this programme we report from Tunisia on the economic issues that have been powering the so-called Arab Spring - the wave of mass protests that continues to sweep through the Arab world. Plus our regular commentator Peter York explores just how real the claim of Real Politik is.
And Justin Rowlatt ...
Billions of dollars of corporate sponsorship have made football the world's richest sport. Yet Fifa, the body that runs the game, has been rocked by a series of corruption scandals. Justin Rowlatt interviews Patrick Nally, the man behind the first big sponsorship deals for world football back in the ...
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