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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Space: From asteroid mining to lunar tourism, pioneers at the Future in Review technology conference in California explain how they plan to commercialise the final frontier.
New technologies that could help developing countries are the focus of our first of two programmes from the Future in Review conference in California. Presenter Ed Butler speaks to Lori Steele Contorer of Everyone Counts about her company's electronic voting software, and why she thinks it is more secure ...
On Business Daily we're looking at the mixed fortunes of Bitcoin. The world's most famous, or infamous digital currency almost imploded last year with the collapse of its biggest global exchange. But it's far from dead yet. Retailers from Singapore to San Francisco are still embracing this controversial ...
Business Daily is in Romania to explore the challenges facing the economy of a country once described as Europe's Tiger. Despite an impressive rate of growth, Romania has one of the highest levels of poverty anywhere in the European Union. Twenty five years on from the fall of communism, capitalism has ...
The driverless car is racing through the pipeline and might be on our roads within ten years, according to the developers of Google's new unmanned car. Is it safe and what are the legal obstacles? Justin Webb is in California to talk to Google about its development. And Lucy Kellaway considers how many ...
Will setting higher minimum wage levels solve the problem of wage stagnation? Ed Butler is joined by Arne Kalleberg Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the RSA, based in London and Paola Subacchi Research Director of International Economics at ...
The US-Europe Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership talks - will they deliver economic growth, and will it be at the expense of consumer and environmental protection? Andrew Walker reports from Brussels, where he hears from the EU Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht about the economic benefits ...
Can a country afford to pay all workers $25 an hour? Unions in Switzerland say you can't survive there on less. Plus a new Institute examines the quest for Global Prosperity. And our Hong Kong correspondent, Juliana Liu, describes her encounter with the owner of one of the world's biggest internet firms, ...
What are the risks posed by the use of robots - unmanned aircraft for example - in wars of the future? What are the legal frameworks needed to ensure that new battlefield technology is used in a way that is ethical and complies with international law? Stephen Goose of the arms division of Human Rights ...
What has the free-market delivered for Hungary and her people? We have a progress report on the country's extraordinary economic journey, in the 25 since the end of Soviet communism. And billionaire philanthropist, George Soros, recalls his own involvement in the momentous 1989 revolution in Hungary ...
If you thought the western economies were finally shaking off recession and posting reasonable growth rates, think again. They may be suffering a new malaise. Welcome to the world of "secular stagnation". Business Daily speaks to former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers about what secular stagnation ...
China's economy will overtake the US as the world's largest this year, according to a grouping of the world’s leading statistical agencies called the International Comparison Program. We'll be asking if that matters, and discussing whether we're just too focused on numbers. Is there more to economic ...
India is voting. Political parties are in the final stretch of a marathon five-week vote, with results expected on May 16th. The country now has 100 million Facebook users and over 30 million Twitter accounts making these India's first digital elections.
Abenomics: A year-and-a-half on, we challenge economy minister Akira Amari about Japan's multi-arrowed strategy to escape two decades of economic stagnation. Also in the programme, we hear from Katy Watson in Sao Paulo about how Brazil has more than just the World Cup on its mind - many ordinary Brazilians ...
Plastics are one of the most useful substances known to man, strong, durable and abundant; but once in the environment, they are here to stay. Professor Andrea Sella tells us about the unique properties of carbon-based plastics; why they are so useful and why they are so hard to get rid of. And Dr Susan ...
South Africa is to vote in an election in which the country's massive economic divide will be the key issue. Has the ANC been able to convince the electorate that education reforms and economic development will, at last, help those at the very bottom? Matthew Davies visits the township of Bekkersdal, ...
Tanya Beckett is in Poland, where the story is one of remarkable economic growth following its diversification from traditional, heavy industries like shipbuilding into modern globalised sectors. She visits a car factory where state of the art technology is driving the pace of change. Plus, we hear from ...
Should nationalism play a role in foreign takeovers? Politicians say national interests need to be protected as US companies, Pfizer and General Electric, make approaches to the UK's AstraZeneca and France's Alstom respectively.

Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses the question with Yannick Naud of ...
Thomas Piketty's book "Capital in the Twenty-First Century" has been shaking up the field of economics. The French economist argues that capitalism breeds inequality. In an interview with presenter Manuela Saragosa, he says that governments need to dramatically change their tax regime to ensure wealth ...
The Berlin Wall fell in 1989 - 25 years later we look back at East Germany's difficult journey from a Communist state to the home of the most powerful capital in Europe. Presenter Tanya Beckett speaks to two "Ossies" who were still at school when the country reunified. She visits the model Communist ...
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