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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Why wouldn't you want a free trade deal that could add billions to your economy? We discuss the pluses and minuses of the world's biggest trade deal between the US and the EU. Markus Beyrer, director general of BusinessEurope, explains why he's in support of a deal, and John Hilary, executive director ...
As 30 die in Mariupol we ask will punishing Russia with sanctions bring an end to the attacks in eastern Ukraine? Or, is the West misunderstanding the extent of Putin's resolve in the region? And in the end, how much money will the West have to spend to underpin the indebted Ukrainian economy? Sir Rodric ...
What do this week's fourth quarter earnings of some of the world's biggest technology firms - Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple - tell us about the sector? The Silicon valley-based technology analyst Larry Magid gives us his take. Also, Thomson Reuters chief technology correspondent for Asia, Jeremy ...
Drone technology: Businesses are experimenting with it, so what does the future hold? We look at developments in shipping and farming, among others, and its regulation. It's not just about remote-controlled flying objects. And why you won't be getting any deliveries by drone anytime soon.
A dramatic fall in world oil prices has prompted big job cuts and project cancellations across the industry, and could force Islamic State to look for different income sources. Tom Keatinge, director of financial crime & security studies at RUSI tells us how the militant jihadist group Islamic State, ...
We expose a new kind of slave trade: the farming of poor Indians' blood to supply hospital patients. We have a special report from Delhi and we hear from US author, Scott Carney, whose book "The Red Market" examines the billion-dollar global trade in human body parts, and body products, generally. And ...
Business Daily today focusses on Greece - a vote for change from the electorate, as the left-wing Syriza party is swept to power. But are Greece's European partners ready to finance an end to austerity? We hear from Athens and seek the German perspective. Also in the programme, speculating on what life ...
Billions of dollars are being spent trying to keep our towns and cities safe from the global terror threat but is it money well spent? Listen to former US Assistant Secretary of State James Rubin, the man in charge of policing London before the 7/7 terror attack there in 2005 Lord Blair, the BBC's security ...
In the eurozone, shares rise, the currency falls, and bond yields drop as the European Central Bank unveils quantitative easing. Will all that money being printed ever trickle down to the real economy? We ask Andrew Wilson, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management. Also, the BBC's Mishal ...
The European Central Bank announces a 60bn euros per month asset-buying programme as the eurozone economy continues to flag. The BBC's Andrew Walker talks us through the details, and Gemma Godfrey, head of investment strategy at Brooks MacDonald, tells us what it means for the markets. Plus, we look ...
The European Central Bank is expected to announce a massive asset-buying programme - otherwise known as quantitative easing, or QE - in an effort to revive the eurozone economy, but skeptics say it may not make much of a difference. Plus, we look at how the euro's buying power varies hugely throughout ...
In his State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said that the US economy is healed and it's time to turn the page, and create a stronger and more expensive safety net for middle class and poor Americans. Is he right? We speak to Adam Posen, president of the Peterson Institute for International ...
Growth figures from China are the lowest in nearly 25 years.And the IMF has reduced its earlier global forecast. What's of most concern? We hear from Olivier Blanchard, the IMF's chief economist, and from Miranda Carr, director of the UK consultancy, Mulan Advisory & Investments, which gives advice on ...
Are India's leaders prioritising economic growth over freedom of expression for environmental pressure groups like Greenpeace? We hear from Priya Pillai, a campaigner for Greenpeace India, and get the response from Narasimha Rao from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party - the BJP. Also on the programme, ...
If women had an equal slice of the global economic cake, output could soar by as much as 40%. So it seems like a no brainer that women might then look forward to a fairer share? And yet the division of the economic spoils for women in terms of job prospects, earnings and basic employment rights are nowhere ...
Is Switzerland in danger of losing its status as a safe haven for investors? And who are the winners and losers of the sharp rise in the Swiss Franc? We ask Kern Alexander, professor at the University of Zurich. Also on the programme, why don't women speak up at business meetings? Psychology researcher ...
Steve Evans in Seoul investigates the evolving economy of North Korea. He speaks to Andrei Lankov, a Russian academic in Seoul, who explains how capitalism is bleeding in to North Korean society. Swiss businessman Felix Abt tells him how he set up the Pyongyang Business School, and North Korean tour ...
Why does the family firm work in South Korea when in many countries hereditary leaders aren't considered to be the best bosses. Plus the government's attempts to put everything online with its e-Government programme.
Business Daily is gripped by the spectre of falling prices. A good thing, some might reckon, as everything in the shops gets cheaper. But the legacy of past crises suggests it's not so simple. Could deflation spell disaster for the eurozone. What is it anyway, and why is it so bad? We hear from two UK ...
We explore the effect a crashing oil price is having on oil companies - it's reported some of them are renting entire ocean-going super-tankers just to store the stuff while they wait for the price to rise. Also, in the year of a crucial global Climate Summit, we ask what cheap oil means for the renewable ...
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