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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Vanadium, and obscure metal, provides the latest installment in our journey through the economics of the periodic table. Our regular chemistry maestro, Prof Andrea Sella of University College London, demonstrates vanadium's surprisingly colourful properties. Presenter Justin Rowlatt meets the chief executive ...
We hear from the influential former President of Ghana John Kufuor, who tells us that not enough has been done to create an environment in which the private sector flourishes, enabling smaller businesses to take root and a solid African middle class to grow. Tokunboh Ishmael is co-founder of Alitheia ...
Tech pioneer, Elon Musk, explains his latest ventures: electric cars, and exploring space. Also in the programme, I get to glimpse North Korean soft power at work - inside the country's one and only officially sanctioned global restaurant chain. And the BBC's Rahul Tandon considers the commercial challenges ...
Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use? And does all that data make us more productive, or less?

In the week that software giant Apple unveiled its icloud drive - yet another internet-based way for us to manage and store all the data in our lives - we're going to ...
Is technology surrounding us with more information than we can possibly use? And does all that data make us more productive, or less?

In the week that software giant Apple unveiled its icloud drive - yet another internet-based way for us to manage and store all the data in our lives - we're going to ...
Robots and smart machines are changing the world we live in - in rich countries, some supermarkets are already offering entirely automated check-outs. But how far are we humans willing to put up with dealing with machines, the lack of personal interaction? And how smart are these robots really?
We hear ...
In our second programme about this most paradoxical of chemical elements, we examine how nitrogen-based fertilisers have ushered in an era of abundant food - but at a cost.
We dispatch Rajini Vaidyanathan to see - and smell - first-hand how the nitrogen is extracted from raw sewage, to stop it killing ...
Some 29 million may find themselves enslaved today - from those in bonded labour to others trafficked into sexual slavery. We hear one woman's tragic tale and look at some ingenious business and technological solutions. Presenter Ed Butler speaks to Dr Kevin Montgomery of Stanford University about his ...
Coal: President Obama announces new curbs on America's most polluting power source. Also, ahead of this month's World Cup, we assess the real risks for visiting fans and businesses.
And on the advent of her 55th birthday, our regular commentator, Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times, considers whether ...
Sri Lanka is wooing Western investors, hoping to lure them back now that the decades-long civil war is well and truly over. Also in the programe, Stephen Dubner - who along with co-author Steven Levitt has penned the Freakonomics series of books - explains what it takes to "Think Like a Freak".
Serbia and Bosnia: After the worst floods in a century, the EBRD president tells us the scale of the rebuilding task - and how to avoid the landmines. Financial lawyer and commentator Timothy Spangler talks to presenter Jamie Robertson about what exactly hedge funds are, and whether they ought to be ...
Nitrogen - the world's most abundant gas - has brought life and death to humanity on an epic scale, and tragedy to the scientists that have harnessed its power. In the first of two programmes on nitrogen, chemistry guru Andrea Sella explains how the forces that make this gas so stable are the same ones ...
Meet the climate change mercenaries - people trying to make a profit out of global warming. Presenter Justin Rowlatt travels to Greenland where Prime Minister Aleqa Hammond hopes the retreating ice will create business opportunities - such as the successful gold prospecting. We hear about the opening ...
It's six months since the devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines and there are still many people there without homes and livelihoods. But there is a ray of hope for the country. The Philippine economy has seemingly turned a corner and is now the fastest growing in Southeast Asia. Linda Yueh speaks ...
Is there a crisis in global healthcare? Spiralling costs, aging populations and in some cases failing treatments have all added to that general feeling. But are there technological solutions? Ed Butler is at the Future in Review conference in California where he discusses this with a distinguished panel of guests.
Space: From asteroid mining to lunar tourism, pioneers at the Future in Review technology conference in California explain how they plan to commercialise the final frontier.
New technologies that could help developing countries are the focus of our first of two programmes from the Future in Review conference in California. Presenter Ed Butler speaks to Lori Steele Contorer of Everyone Counts about her company's electronic voting software, and why she thinks it is more secure ...
On Business Daily we're looking at the mixed fortunes of Bitcoin. The world's most famous, or infamous digital currency almost imploded last year with the collapse of its biggest global exchange. But it's far from dead yet. Retailers from Singapore to San Francisco are still embracing this controversial ...
Business Daily is in Romania to explore the challenges facing the economy of a country once described as Europe's Tiger. Despite an impressive rate of growth, Romania has one of the highest levels of poverty anywhere in the European Union. Twenty five years on from the fall of communism, capitalism has ...
The driverless car is racing through the pipeline and might be on our roads within ten years, according to the developers of Google's new unmanned car. Is it safe and what are the legal obstacles? Justin Webb is in California to talk to Google about its development. And Lucy Kellaway considers how many ...
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