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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

In The Balance asks if our cities can cope in the face of rapid urbanisation. We hear from the megacity of Dhaka in Bangladesh, where migrants are struggling with poor water, health and schooling services. We also go to Beijing, where marathon runners last year were force to pull out, or run in masks, ...
Tim Berners-Lee, father of the world wide web, discusses the future of the internet, as Justin Rowlatt reports from the Science Museum's newly-opened Information Age gallery.
We preview Sunday's final round presidential elections in Brazil, which the polls indicate are dividing down class lines and are too close to call. Also in the programme, we assess China's worsening economic progress, and look at what some see as the sorry state of expert forecasting.
We look at an industry that some say is spiralling out of control. From Brazil to Beijing, people are spending some 10 billion dollars a year on cosmetic surgery, from hair and breast implants to nose jobs. Increasingly they're travelling internationally to find the best deals on what are often expensive ...
We look at a credit crisis in Africa. It's not the kind where there's too much money sloshing around, for most poor Africans there's none at all. 80% of Africans don't even have a bank account, let alone any formal way of getting a loan, and many say the banks are excluding them. A Nobel prizewinner ...
We chart the oil smuggling that's fuelling Islamic State's military machine. And why is the global art market set once again to beat all records this year? Also in the programme, Lucy Kellaway asks whether - in the workplace - cream always rises to the top.
In the Balance examines career change. Jamie Robertson talks to the tennis star Boris Becker about his career change to a businessman and we hear from serial entrepreneurs Hailo founder Jay Bregman and Michiel Mol who has changed careers from video games to space travel with a number of projects in between. ...
Huawei, the world's largest telecoms company, gives the BBC's Linda Yueh unprecedented access, including an exclusive interview with the Chinese firm's chief executive Guo Ping.
Food prices are falling substantially for the first time in years, but what is driving them lower and what does it mean for the long term sustainability of food supplies? Also in the programme, an appropriately tasty treat - is there money to be made out of milkshakes made from the fruit of the Baobab ...
How new technologies are being used as never before, to make managing disaster events more efficient, making communications and aid delivery possible, as never before.
The controversies over fracking - extracting oil from the rocks - in the US. Meeting the energy needs of the developing world and China's role in the renewable energy business.
The solutions used tackle climate change are failing because they cling to the old norms of economic analysis. So says Naomi Klein in her new book. Is she right? Rahul Tandon reports on a new Indian football league. And Lucy Kellaway considers the notion of taking as much holiday as you can afford. Sounds ...
In the Balance is drilling for oil - or rather for some explanations of what's been happening to prices: why have they been falling when the Middle East is in turmoil? After all, conflict in the region has often been the spark for sharp rises in the price of crude oil.
Andrew Walker is joined by Seth ...
Malawi in southern Africa, is a country recently rocked by scandal. Tens of millions of dollars of government money was being skimmed from the national budget - some of it supplied by foreign donors. As a result, the donors have stopped funding the government altogether. So what is the effect of this ...
Business Daily comes from Brussels - the heart of the European Union - where in the last day we have discovered that the new commissioner for internal market and services will be Britain's Lord Hill. Tanya Beckett hears from the man currently doing that job, Michel Barnier, as well as influential economist, ...
Uranium is the fuel for nuclear power stations, which generate carbon-free electricity, but also highly radioactive waste, posing a major dilemma for environmentalists.
Uranium is the fuel for nuclear power stations, which generate carbon-free electricity, but also radioactive waste thats lasts millennia. In the latest in our series looking at the world economy from the perspective of the elements of the periodic table, Justin Rowlatt visits Sizewell nuclear power station, ...
A former employee of the New York Federal Reserve releases secret recordings of her colleagues, raising questions about the methods being used by the NY Fed to regulate the banks. And our regular commentator James Srodes considers life after the telephone landline.
Economies are growing again and optimism about future growth is picking up... so why is it that the world's debt mountain continues to grow, despite these positive factors? And if business gibberish is something which you find impenetrable, our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times agrees.
Many regard Hong Kong as China's bridge to the wider global economy, but is that still the case now that Hong Kong's economy is dwarfed by that of its giant neighbour? Economically and financially, how much does Hong Kong still matter to China these days? Joining the discussion are Hong Kong-based independent ...
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