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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Many regard Hong Kong as China's bridge to the wider global economy, but is that still the case now that Hong Kong's economy is dwarfed by that of its giant neighbour? Economically and financially, how much does Hong Kong still matter to China these days? Joining the discussion are Hong Kong-based independent ...
Brazil's election: what do voters, workers, economists and businesspeople make of the race between incumbent Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and Socialist challenger Marina Silva?
Poverty in India: New PM Narendra Modi said he would prioritise toilets over temples, but is lack of water, sanitation and other public services the country's biggest challenge?
Lead is the sweetest of poisons, blamed for everything from mad Roman emperors to modern-day crime waves. Yet a lead-acid battery is still what gets your car going in the morning. So have we finally learnt how to handle this heavyweight element?
The boss of the world's biggest insulin maker talks about new treatments and prevention for diabetes; and should sugary drinks be taxed to tackle this killer disease? And international brand names may be a familiar sight around the world. But in Ethiopia they are not always what they seem.
After dramatic protests about democracy in Hong Kong, we get an assessment from the BBC's Chief Business Correspondent Linda Yueh of what it means for the territory's economic future? As the British Conservative party holds its annual conference, the prospect of the UK leaving the European Union is on ...
Following the major United Nations climate gathering in New York - we ask if the summit's premise - that economic growth is compatible with protecting the environment - is right? Manuela Saragosa and guests : Jennifer Turner, China environment expert at the Wilson Center in Washington DC, Shreekant ...
Silicon Valley's Peter Thiel tells us we are living in an age of technological stagnation; we should be more aggressive in pursuing discoveries that challenge death and ageing.
Forex rigging: Is manipulation of the global currency markets the next big scandal to engulf the banking industry? The way financial benchmarks are being calculated is being scrutinised by regulators across the globe. Banks have already faced big fines over the Libor scandal, but what is next? Lesley ...
The atomic clock runs on caesium, and has redefined the very meaning of time. But it has also introduced a bug into timekeeping that affects everything from computerised financial markets to electricity grids to satellite navigation to the Greenwich Meridian.
We look at the climate change debate ahead of a key United Nations Summit taking place in New York. Scientists say that global temperatures are rising faster than ever as a result of increased carbon emissions, and yet top leaders from some of the most polluting countries are not even bothering to come ...
Why is Russia curbing gas supplies to Europe? What does this imply for Europe's winter fuel bill? And could Moscow be most concerned by the recent drop in the world oil price? Also in the programme, Lucy Kellaway asks whether gender and ethnic diversity in the boardroom are not always the great virtue ...
People in Scotland have voted to remain in the United Kingdom, following a referendum. We get reaction from markets, investors and campaigners from both sides of the debate. Joining Ed Butler are businessman Sir Brian Souter, entrepreneur Patrick MacDonald, Angus Armstrong from the National Institute ...
Shares in Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce giant, start trading in New York on Friday: Is the global frenzy around its initial public offering justified? Also, Zurich-based author Guy Spier, tells us how he went from being a "Gordon Gekko" investor interested mainly in short-term profits to one with a ...
Bromine-based flame retardants are all over your home, but are they a health risk? Presenter Justin Rowlatt hears from the perennial Andrea Sella of University College London and speaks to chemicals industry analyst Laura Syrett of Industrial Minerals about why she thinks bromine may have been the ...
We take a detailed look at the state of the world's business schools: what they're teaching and whether business is better for them; have lessons been learnt from the financial crisis? Also in the programme, we visit Peterhead in Scotland, the UK's largest fishing port, to see how trawlermen there feel ...
The US says up to 300 billion dollars of commercial intellectual property is stolen by Chinese firms every year. A British Minister now tells us things are improving. Who's right? And separately, we hear from Lucy Kellaway on what she believes is the billions wasted every year by companies on their sales ...
What's the point of economic forecasts? A recent IMF report revealed the shocking extent to which economists generally failed to predict any of the recessions of 2009. Do we set too much store by predictions? Or have we simply got the wrong idea about what they're for? Tim Harford, author of The Undercover ...
The Business of Breakfast: A bowl of corn flakes used to be standard fare in western economies, helping drive a cereal industry worth an estimated $10bn a year in the US. But sales of cereal are in steady decline while high protein alternatives such as eggs and bacon are increasingly popular. We have ...
African states have been bitten by the savings bug: Nigeria, Ghana and Angola, among others, have set up sovereign wealth funds. But who ensures they are well-managed? And the BBC's Rahul Tandon explains the economics that link fish prices and football in Calcutta.
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