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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

You might have thought Russians would think twice about Cyprus after losing billions in 2013's bank collapse. But not so, it seems, with closer ties agreed only last month. We get a report from the Mediterranean island. And we hear from a remarkably upbeat David Horgan, the managing director of the small ...
Iron is the chemical element at the heart of steel, and by extension of industrialisation, so what does the collapse in iron ore prices say about the economic progress of China and India?
Is the steel-making party over, or is a new one just about to begin? And will humanity, one day, stop digging this ...
Is there a right way of dealing with mental health issues in the workplace? Presenter Manuela Saragosa speaks to Alastair Campbell about how he managed his depression while he worked as a chief spokesman for the former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Also, it has been two years since Sheryl Sandberg, ...
Why are more women buying guns in the US? We have a special report from a women-only club at a Virginia shooting range, and presenter Manuela Saragosa speaks to Brian Ruttenbur of CRT Capital Group who says President Obama's administration has, paradoxically, been a boon to the US firearms industry. ...
George Soros argues that European failure to offer Ukraine more economic help will end in disaster, as standards of living there plunge and the threat from Russia continues.
Can global poverty be wiped out in the next 15 years? The World Bank thinks so. Linda Yueh hears from the president, Jim Yong Kim, who is confident despite the rising numbers of poor in Africa. Tulanana Bohela reports from Tanzania, one of the fastest growing economies in Africa, but where a third of ...
What are the big economic issues as Nigerians head to the polls in a general election this weekend? We speak to Dr. Obadiah Mailafia, former deputy governor of the Nigerian Central Bank, and we have a special report from the BBC's Sam Olukoya in Lagos. Plus, ahead of UK general elections in May, a survey ...
In our latest look at the role of the chemical elements in the global economy, we focus on the two key ingredients that enabled the mass production of steel.
Justin Rowlatt chews on salad leaves with Andrea Sella of University College London.
He travels to Sheffield - the birthplace of modern steelmaking ...
In an eclectic Business Daily, we look at the latest eurozone talks, small businesses in Kosovo and a rather large lingerie empire. Ed Butler speaks to Prof James Galbraith, an unofficial advisor to the Greek finance minister, about how urgent Greece's financial plight has become and what can be gained ...
Business Daily looks at the legacy of the late Lee Kwan Yew. Singapore's first Prime Minister is credited with turning an island state into an Asian power-house. Critics called him an autocrat. He said denying civil liberties was a necessary part of achieving growth. Also in the programme, Also in the ...
The sharing economy is worth big money world-wide but who are the winners and losers as more of us choose to borrow not buy or to share our homes, our cars, our pets, our time...? We talk to some of the sector's success stories - Airbnb, Zipcar and Compare and Share - and we hear from a critic who is ...
2022 World Cup: Has Qatar done enough to improve the conditions of migrants working on its football construction projects? We speak to Nicholas McGheehan of Human Rights Watch who has seen their working and living conditions first-hand. Also, Professor Amartya Sen, Nobel prize-winning economist, tells ...
The dollar dropped as the US Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen indicated her patience with its strength was wearing thin - but what does it mean for the US economy and for currency markets? Manuela Saragosa hears from BBC business correspondent Simon Jack, and from strategist Bill Blain of brokerage ...
In the first of three programmes about iron, Justin Rowlatt explores two moments in industrial history that transformed this most abundant of metal elements into the key material out of which modern life is constructed. And they both took place right here in the British Isles.
South America's biggest nation faces drought, scandal and slowdown. Yet until recently, Brazil was considered to be one of the world's most promising emerging markets. What's gone wrong? We have a report from the BBC's South America correspondent Daniel Gallas. Also, what Greece can learn from Israel ...
Are billions of dollars in international flows of dirty money lying buried deep in the trade statistics of developed countries such as the UK? Also, we hear from Houston about how the US funds its arts scene. And should we celebrate the office curmudgeon?
In the face of an ever changing employment market, and a workforce that is not only globalised but also increasingly technology driven, what kind of education works to equip today's students for the workplaces of the future? And what does business need? We hear from a panel of educational experts including ...
Motor car racing is an expensive sport, so how do F1 teams make ends meet? Manuela Saragosa speaks to leading Formula 1 academic Mark Jenkins of Cranfield University to find out.
We also dispatch Briohny Williams to visit her namesake team - Williams - to discover how its cutting edge technology is helping ...
The BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker explains why the euro has weakened against the dollar and what it means for the eurozone. Also, Slavoj Zizek, a cultural theorist, Marxist philosopher and international director at the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in London, looks at what the eurozone ...
Technetium is essential for medical imaging, yet supplies of this short-lived manmade element are far from guaranteed. We see a technetium scan in progress and a cow being milked, and hear the yarn of the 70-year chemistry wild goose chase sparked by this mysterious radioactive metal.
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