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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Uganda's central bank governor tells us of his frustration with the banks who refuse to lower their high interest rates. We look at debt problems in Uganda, and the scourge of inflation - how it affects ordinary people. Plus Lucy Kellaway looks at the strange and wonderful bonding that happens when workers ...
This week Manuela Saragosa and her guests take on the elements: not the weather, but tantalum, europium, polonium, iridium, samarium - to name but a few. They're not just mysterious names on a periodic table, they're metals and minerals found in everyday products from laptops to mobile phones. But is ...
In Brussels European Union leaders yet again negotiate through the night, this time to tie down their spending plans. Is this really the right way to take such important decisions? And the benefits and the downside of tackling crime in Rio de Janeiro's slums. Plus the surprising stories behind some everyday ...
Business Daily is in Brussels. As EU leaders gather to wrangle over the details of a seven year budget worth nearly a trillion Euro, we get a business view about what the spending priorities should be. And we visit a project intended to support European economic development by encouraging young people ...
The risks to the global economy have apparently receded, but an influential commentator argues there's trouble ahead. In any case, when we judge economic performance are we measuring the right thing? Does the widely used indicator gross domestic product or GDP tell us anything useful? Plus - in an age ...
Saad Mohseni, known as the 'Rupert Murdoch of Afghanistan' talks to Lesley Curwen about the booming media business, corruption and what happens after western peacekeepers leave the country. And US behavioural economist Keith Chen suggests that your native language may dictate the decisions you take about ...
Mining companies in South Africa lost hundreds of millions of dollars from disruption caused by unrest last year. The Marikana platinum mine was the scene of shootings which claimed over forty lives during strikes which halted production for more than a month. Last month, Anglo American Platinum revealed ...
Is inflation still public enemy number one? For most of us it simply means price rises, but is there a positive side to this one-time economic bogeyman? Plus with the help of our resident comedian, Colm O'Regan, we go in search of economic nirvana Is there's such a thing as a perfect economy? Or is it ...
Ahead of the Superbowl and the quarter finals of the Cup of Nations, this edition of Business Daily is all about sport. We explore the rather shocking theory that American football is run on socialist lines, whereas European football is just the opposite. And we hear about the soccer transfer window ...
Europe's banks may no longer be in a critical state - but the chronic headache of the debt crisis lingers on. In Business Daily we hear from the man administering the medicine to Europe's financial institutions Michel Barnier. And we ask if the organs keeping cash flowing through the continent's veins ...
Egypt's economy - is it in a worse state now than before the revolution? Business Daily visits a textiles factory in Egypt to hear how people feel freer to protest - but they're finding it hard to cope with high food prices and joblessness. Plus the huge appetite for cellphones in Burma - pity there's ...
Business Daily looks at whether the great dream of hydrogen as a clean fuel of the future, is still alive. Lesley Curwen hops on a London bus powered by hydrogen - and hears from an American scientist who says he has solved all the problems of making the stuff in your home, where you need it. So could ...
What will be the wider economic effects of the Mali conflict? Some experts have talked about an 'arc of instability' spreading across the north of Africa. Alex Vines, head of the Africa Programme at Chatham House explains why he strongly disagrees with that assessment.

Lesley Curwen talks to Dame Lucy ...
We host a passionate debate this week about whether companies are there to please their shareholders or do good: can they do both? We'll hear from a CEO and a historian in Davos and a self-styled professional libertarian in London. And our in-house comedian, Colm O'Regan, looks at the notion of exclusivity, ...
The BBC's Economics Editor Stephanie Flanders presents a special edition of Business Daily from the annual World Economic Forum in the Swiss mountain resort, Davos. She speaks to the Chief Executive of Goldman Sachs Lloyd Blankfein about the morality of tax and discusses the UK Prime Minister's decision ...
From a ski resort in the Swiss Alps we hear German reaction to British plans to renegotiate the terms of its EU membership. Or rather, we don't hear it, because it's very quiet... Is the German chancellor Angela Merkel anxious not to rock the Euro-boat?

And if Europe can't sort its problems out, why ...
Business Daily comes to you from the World Economic Forum in the Swiss mountain resort of Davos, in Switzerland. As the great and the good chew over the past few years of the economic downturn we hear from two of the men holding the purse strings of the global economy. Olivier Blanchard, Chief Economist ...
It looks like the US Congress will allow the Obama administration to borrow the money it needs to keep the government running - but only for a few more months. And there are deep spending cuts due in March. What are the implications for the US economy? George Magnus, independent adviser to UBS, gives ...
The head of one of the world's biggest publishers tells Justin Rowlatt how she is balancing the books. We've got Britain's biggest bookseller on how he's going to keep bookshops open and one author tells us how he is printing his own books - and keeping all the profits.
Can you turn a dirty Mafia firm into a clean business? Alan Johnston reports from near Naples on the authorities trying to reclaim companies previously run by organised crime.

Lesley Curwen talks to author and Mafia expert Jeffrey Robinson who says it 'always ends in tears' when small firms get into ...
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