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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

New rules and regulations for the British banking sector, but what will it mean for doing business in London and for London's future as a global banking hub? Five years on from the global financial crisis we hear from the man setting up new rules for banking in London, Andrew Bailey, Deputy Governor ...
The population is rising, weather patterns are changing - does that mean the world is going to struggle to feed itself? Or is there actually already more than enough food to go round? Is the real problem that so many people around the world can't afford food? We hear from got a couple of titans of world ...
Do central bankers need to be more realistic about what they can achieve, or are we simply asking too much of them? We chew over the role of central banker with the top economist George Magnus. He's a senior independent economic adviser at UBS investment bank. We also hear from Lucy Kellaway of the Financial ...
Business leaders spend their lives climbing the corporate ladder, so what happens when it is time to step off? Evan Davis and guests discuss life after CEO. Evan's guests are: Lord Browne of Madingley, former Chief Executive of BP; Kate Wilson, former MD of Scholastic UK and now Managing Director of ...
Deflation is something of an economic bogeyman - but is it real, and does it threaten to drag the eurozone into Japanese-style stagnation? Presenter Ed Butler hears from two monetary economists, Steve Hanke who dubs the spectre of falling prices a "big phoney", and Paul de Grauwe who warns it could mean ...
Could prices in Venezuela be at risk of spiralling out of control - with riots on the streets in Caracas and inflation already the highest in the world. Presenter Ed Butler speaks to a former head of the country's central bank. In a special on hyperinflation, we also look at past cases of this monetary ...
As older workers become increasingly commonplace in the rapidly ageing industrialised world, Ed Butler asks whether they represent a burden or a blessing. He speaks to renowned anthropologist Jared Diamond about how tribal societies deal with their aged. We hear from Germany, which has the most advanced ...
With ever more damaging revelations about the spying activities of western governments, we ask how scared should we be about the high-level snooping - what does it mean for ordinary citizens like you and me? Also, listening to the deaf - why perceived disabilities may offer an opportunity to business.
Urban centres are the economic powerhouses of most nations - do they need more freedom? We're in Brazil where delays to World Cup football stadiums and infrastructure projects have meant the reputation of some cities have taken a battering. Will Brazil's cities will be able to pull it out of the bag ...
Abenomics is the name given to a massive economic project launched a year ago by Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. In the Balance explores whether the project is paying off and asks what are the dangers, as Japan aims to bring back growth to its moribund economy. Ed Butler is joined by guests Richard ...
Today Business Daily features a special look at a group of people often regarded as without hope - the street children of Delhi. Many imagine they'd be demoralised and broken by their sometimes tragic lives. But Justin Rowlatt found a different kind of reality with the children many have forgotten.
The fashion industry tells women that beautiful is tall and skinny. With the start of London Fashion Week on Friday, we ask, why does this ideal continue to sell? And how has it changed over the years? We speak to those on the inside: a former editor of Vogue, and a supplier of mannequins to department ...
The rise of the machines: we look at whether intelligent computers could threaten Mankind's supremacy on earth. Artificial intelligence is the great prize for the world's biggest technology companies - imagine how useful a computer that could think for itself would be. But will these super-intelligent ...
Would the world be a better, more productive place if women were in charge? The BBC's Chief Business Correspondent Linda Yueh chairs a top drawer debate which includes the IMF's boss Christine Lagarde, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Executive Director of UN Women Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka and Carlos Ghosn ...
How the phone in your hand and the computer on your desk may have helped fund conflict in Africa, and what's being done about it. And on a lighter note, Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times wonders whether there's a correlation between good hair, women and power in the boardroom.
How can lawmakers incentivise businesses and governments to fight corruption and to blow the whistle on corrupt practices? Justin Rowlatt and guests convene in London's historic Chatham House to discuss how co-ordinated action around the globe can throw light into the darkest corners of corporate or ...
Described as the most expensive Olympic Games ever with an estimate $50 billion spent on venues and accompanying infrastructure, are the Sochi Winter Olympics doing any good for Russia's image around the world?
Setting a minimum wage in Germany: is it populist politics or sound economics? The BBC's Steve Evans reports from Berlin. And we discuss the arguments on either side of the minimum wage debate.
Miami, the USA gateway to Central and South America, once famous for cocaine cowboys and a comfortable retirement is, in 2014, booming with unprecedented growth in real estate, tourism, banking and, now, also the tech sector. The city's leaders say Miami is more than just a regional hub; they believe, ...
What will help reduce India's high levels of poverty? Justin Rowlatt has his ears cleaned by a curb-side ear de-waxer on a New Dehli backstreet all in an effort to understand India's vast informal economy. And a unique effort to tackle deforestation in Brazil comes to an end. What effect will it have ...
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