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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Abenomics: A year-and-a-half on, we challenge economy minister Akira Amari about Japan's multi-arrowed strategy to escape two decades of economic stagnation. Also in the programme, we hear from Katy Watson in Sao Paulo about how Brazil has more than just the World Cup on its mind - many ordinary Brazilians ...
Plastics are one of the most useful substances known to man, strong, durable and abundant; but once in the environment, they are here to stay. Professor Andrea Sella tells us about the unique properties of carbon-based plastics; why they are so useful and why they are so hard to get rid of. And Dr Susan ...
South Africa is to vote in an election in which the country's massive economic divide will be the key issue. Has the ANC been able to convince the electorate that education reforms and economic development will, at last, help those at the very bottom? Matthew Davies visits the township of Bekkersdal, ...
Tanya Beckett is in Poland, where the story is one of remarkable economic growth following its diversification from traditional, heavy industries like shipbuilding into modern globalised sectors. She visits a car factory where state of the art technology is driving the pace of change. Plus, we hear from ...
Should nationalism play a role in foreign takeovers? Politicians say national interests need to be protected as US companies, Pfizer and General Electric, make approaches to the UK's AstraZeneca and France's Alstom respectively.

Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses the question with Yannick Naud of ...
Thomas Piketty's book "Capital in the Twenty-First Century" has been shaking up the field of economics. The French economist argues that capitalism breeds inequality. In an interview with presenter Manuela Saragosa, he says that governments need to dramatically change their tax regime to ensure wealth ...
The Berlin Wall fell in 1989 - 25 years later we look back at East Germany's difficult journey from a Communist state to the home of the most powerful capital in Europe. Presenter Tanya Beckett speaks to two "Ossies" who were still at school when the country reunified. She visits the model Communist ...
We discover the element of the periodic table that links soap, paper, heart disease and murder.
Chemistry maestro Andrea Sella explains how sodium is used in everything from street lighting to paints and cosmetics, and what makes soap soapy.
Sodium is great at digesting wood, and we travel to a remote ...
High Frequency Trading: Michael Lewis, author of "Flash Boys" tells presenter Evan Davis what "High Frequency Trading" is, and why he thinks that ordinary investors are losing out in Wall Street's race to adopt ever faster and smarter computers. Also in the programme, Naveena Kottoor reports from Algeria ...
Latvia and nine other former-Communist countries joined the EU 10 years ago this week. Joe Lynam reports from the Baltic state on how it has fared over the last decade, and the country's varying attitudes towards Brussels... and Moscow. But what does Latvia's experience tell us about the European project's ...
Africa's financial services are among the continent's fastest-growing sectors, and companies there are plugging the continent's unbanked into the global financial system. Presenter Manuela Saragosa discusses how, with Diana Layfield, chief executive officer of Africa Operations at Standard Chartered ...
Can Europe's economy continue to deliver rising living standards, and does the EU face political crisis if it cannot? We hear from France where the government is seeking to push for an even more leisurely work-life balance. And Presenter Manuela Saragosa speaks to author Philippe Legrain, who predicts ...
Ed Butler presents an in-depth report from India, as the world’s most populous democracy goes to the polls. The programme features Sameer Kochhar, biographer of BJP leader Narendra Modi, and development economist and Modi critic Jayati Ghosh. Also, the electoral significance of water shortages and corruption.
As President Obama visits Japan, where he will be negotiating over the TPP, a free trade area poised to cover large parts of the Americas and East Asia, the BBC's Chief Business Correspondent Linda Yueh explains the potential benefits. But why is China not involved? Also, the Director-General of the ...
If you thought the reputation of the world's bankers could go no lower then get ready: it’s now claimed that traders at some of the world's biggest banks have been rigging the biggest financial market of them all, the foreign exchange market. That's where the values of the world's currencies are set. ...
Simon Jack asks if we're in a stock market bubble that's set to burst, particularly in the technology sector? Michelle Fleury reports from New York. Also, how the US handles its top footballers' finances. Dr John York, owner of the San Francisco 49ers, gives Simon some ballpark figures...
Rory Cellan-Jones presents a technology special about the Chinese micro-blogging service Weibo, and a potential revival in the idea of social WiFi
In the Balance examines office hierarchy. If some of the latest buzz about the 21st century workplace is to be believed, old-style vertical management structure is dead. Or is it? Are such rumours greatly exaggerated? An anthropologist, a business school prof and a so-called envisioner from Microsoft, ...
Justin Rowlatt tours a distillery to learn about the process of making Scotch Whisky. He hears how the sector has adapted to changing markets worldwide and the importance for it of links to the EU. The shadow minister for trade and investment argues that “no” a vote in the Scottish independence referendum ...
Chlorine is more than just swimming pools and gas attacks. This poisonous green gas is the great enabling element of the chemicals industry, helping to create your clothes, computer chips, medicines, flooring...
Justin Rowlatt travels discovers the brutal process of extracting the chlorine from the ...
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