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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Can the Filipino president maintain his country's economic recovery?
Payday loans are becoming increasingly popular across the world but in some countries they are better regulated than others. Are they saviour or sinner?
As more and more women become the main breadwinners in US households, we ask is the stay at home mum becoming an historical anomaly?
Does money stifle creativity? That's the question the BBC's Arts Editor, Will Gompertz, puts to his guests in this week's edition which comes from the Biennale art show in Venice. They all agree that the art market has changed in the last twenty years, but is it for the better? Ralph Rugoff, Director ...
In Business Daily with Manuela Saragosa, we hear how over two years after the Arab Spring, Morocco is still facing huge economic challenges, plus how a drink beloved of Northern England's temperance movement, Vimto, is proving popular in the middle east.
How do you measure the value of science and research to an economy? In Spain they're learning the hard way as underfunded scientists are being forced overseas to work. And we size up the changing market for bras.
It's one of the few remaining communist states in the world but Vietnam has embraced capitalism enthusiastically. Exports have risen sharply since the market reforms of the 1980s and tourism is booming. We hear from the entrepreneurs whose ambition is keeping the economy moving forward and we find out ...
As Zimbabwe heads to the polls, could the country's ravaged economy be heading towards better times?. We hear what daily economic life is like and what needs to change to give economic recovery a chance. Plus, Lucy Kellaway, makes the case for a good night's sleep,
Business Daily brought together Wallace Kantai, of NTV in Kenya, and Governor Rotimi Amaechi of Rivers State in Nigeria, to ask what makes an African a member of the middle class.
We're also in Brazil, where the Classe C, as the new middle class is known, has risen up to demand more. Our reporter finds ...
As London's Olympic Park comes back to life this weekend with athletes marking the first anniversary of the start of the London Olympics, In the Balance puts its metaphorical trainers on to ask whether the billions of taxpayers' money that went into the Games was worth it. Manuela Saragosa and guests ...
On today's programme with Ed Butler, free trade - what everyone wants and no one can ever agree to. Can Europe and the EU buck the trend and create a trans-Atlantic free trade area?
In today's programme with Nkem Ifejika, could online degrees spell the end for an increased number of traditional campus-based university courses? Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales explains why he thinks they could. Plus, imagine your boss giving you the chance to decide how much paid holiday you should ...
Justin Rowlatt finds out if a ban would affect the supply and demand of street drugs. And the story of the rise and spectacular fall of two of the most successful Indian emigres.
One of the world's biggest pharmaceutical companies is caught up in what Chinese authorities say was a half billion dollar cash and sexual favours bribery scandal. Plus we speak to the man they call the "Steve Jobs of the yoghurt world".
In Japan elections in the upper house have given control to the Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe's ruling coalition. It's been six years since any prime minister controlled both houses of parliament. What does this mean for Mr Abe's plans to reform the Japanese economy? He's spoken about changing labour laws ...
In the last decade the middle class in Brazil has grown by 40 million people. So if their lives have improved so much why are they so angry? On In the Balance, from Sao Paulo, Simon Jack asks if we are witnessing the growing pains of a developing country or a crisis point in Brazil's economic march forward. ...
Will hosting the soccer World Cup give an economic boost to Brazil, a country which has experienced rioting linked to rising prices and poor social services. Simon Jack reports from Rio.
In the second of our programmes from Brazil, Simon Jack asks if the country's boom time is over, plus what impact is the memory of hyperinflation having on today's consumers?
Materially, Brazilians have never been better off; but few have the opportunities they want. So what has gone wrong with Brazil's economy? And what can Brazil's ambitious middle-class hope for from their future? Simon Jack reports from country's largest city, Sao Paulo. He explores why day to day life ...
We're in Macau, gaming capital of the world, to find out why the Chinese are so keen on casinos. We explore the murky world that sustains the gambling industry there, a world of triads and money laundering, worth tens of billions of dollars every year.
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