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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Business Daily sets sail into one of the world's biggest and least talked about industries - international shipping.
We visit London Gateway, the first major new port development in London for almost a century, a harbour capable of taking the very biggest ships in the world. How significant is it that ...
Life depends on phosphorous yet supply is short and dominated by one nation. Business Daily's new series looks at the world economy from the perspective of the chemical elements. Justin Rowlatt speaks to chemist Professor Andrea Sella to find out why phosphorous is vital to all life, and to modern agriculture. ...
As Twitter prepares to float for as much as 17 billion dollars, we ask are we in the midst of another tech bubble? Our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones takes a look at the company's USP. And and we hear from Aswath Damodaran, finance professor at New York University's Stern Scholl of Business, ...
Have the big banks been rigging the international currency markets? We delve into the latest allegations against the club of big institutions that dominate global capital markets. Also in the programme, Evan Davis interviews the American author and intellectual Malcolm Gladwell about his latest book, ...
This week the programme heads to Cambridge for the university's Festival of Ideas to look for inspiration on new ways to solve old economic problems. Manuela Saragosa and her guests ask whether we'll always be condemned to economic cycles of boom and bust. Plus we head to the Orchard Tea Rooms in the ...
The US territory of Puerto Rico is struggling to avoid defaulting on its debts. We ask Alan Schankel of the wealth management firm Janney Montgommery Scott how serious the country's debt problems are.
We also look at debt woes in another corner of the planet - China.
And Justin Rowlatt speaks to the ...
We visit Italy, where many young people say the only place they can get a job is on the black market.
Plus, should older workers give up their jobs to make room for the young? We get the view of the International Labour Organisation.
And with the bust-up between MacDonalds and Heinz, Matt Wells tells ...
There is one corner of Iraq that is relatively free of car bombings and kidnappings - the autonomous and oil-rich northern province Kurdistan. We sent our Middle East Correspondent Kevin Connolly to investigate. Also in the programe, could pathologists be the latest profession to fall foul of the computer ...
A hundred years after the construction of the Panama canal, a project to widen it is underway. But will this 5 billion dollar project deliver the results which had been hoped for? Also in the programme, Sarah Rainsford reports from Cuba on why the government's new reforms make life tough for shopkeepers ...
With house prices creeping up in hot spots around the world, what is the risk of a global housing bubble of the sort which caused the credit crunch crisis of 2008? And is self-confidence always an advantage? Lucy Kellaway isn't so sure.
Bangladesh has the lowest wage garment economy in the world and is still reeling from a catastrophic factory building collapse six months ago in which more than 1130 people died. Most of them have received little or no long term compensation for the deaths of their relatives or their own injuries. ...
For the BBC's 100 Women summit we ask five high-fliers is there still a glass ceiling?
Six months after the collapse of the Rana Plaza garments factory in Bangladesh killed over 1,000 workers, have the victims been compensated, and are the factories any safer?
France isn't the sick man of Europe! So says the French Finance Minister, defending his government's policies in the face of a dangerously sluggish economic performance. And Paul Moss tells us why the French want to right to shop on Sundays.
The global trading boom, which has gone hand in hand with globalisation, is cooling. So what are the consequences for global growth? Elsewhere, in Hungary, a new housing project offers homes to the deeply indebted. And Lucy Kellaway assesses the pros and cons of being Linked In.
Former Chairman of the US Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan talks candidly about the mistakes made in the years running up to the 2008 financial crisis and the risks that lie ahead.
The great new business empires of the world are in technology, that's also where the world's biggest fortunes are being made, so why are so few women involved? Is it, as a former US Treasury secretary once suggested, because of the lack of availability of aptitude at the high end? Justin Rowlatt is ...
With the US debt ceiling crisis deferred for a few months, is can-kicking the best way forward? Is America following the eurozone's lead in dealing with its big financial and economic problems by simply putting them off? Business Daily gets the view from New York and from Beijing. Also in the programme, ...
As Congress cuts a last-minute deal to avert an imminent US debt default, Manuela Saragosa asks whether the crisis is really over, or has it merely been postponed? And have the machinations in Washington done lasting damage to America's international standing as a financial safe haven? Simon Jack reports ...
Today's Business Daily explores that most alluring of pursuits - the hunt for hidden treasure. Yes, you really can make a living searching for wrecks laden with gold and silver - but don't expect it to be easy. And from pirate booty to booty calls: we explore the links between sex, love and money with ...
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