Splice-station-sidebar-header
No-podcasts
Ad
 

BBC Business Daily: Episodes

We ask whether US companies such as Wal-Mart, the biggest private-sector employer, should be made to accept a higher minimum wage.

Also in the programme, we look at the evolution of the office work-space. We hear from a man who monitors where office workers go, who they speak to, even whether they ...
Who are the winners and losers in the US jobs market? Official unemployment figures suggest an improving picture, but we hear about the depressing reality behind the statistics.
We take a look at mercury in the fourth of our series examining the world economy from the chemical elements up. Can the use of this beautiful but deadly element be phased out? That's the aim of an international treaty that comes into force early next year.
An 80% rise in the minimum wage. But will it really help Bangladesh's poor? Bangladesh built its garment industry on cheap labour. Now there's the promise of an eighty per cent rise - although that'll still be among the lowest for factory workers anywhere. Amidst strikes and unrest, we talk to the family ...
We are growing giant sapphires on Business Daily. We're also exploring the shadowy past of the central bankers' central bank - the Bank of International Settlements. Plus: how should you greet an acquaintance - a handshake, a hug, a kiss, a curtsey or maybe a salute? Lucy Kellaway has a plan to solve ...
How can the giant stone currency of the island of Yap help us understand "bitcoin" and the world of virtual currencies? As US senators this week discussed the merits, and dangers, of these so-called crypto currencies, Justin Rowlatt and his guests delve into the opaque world of digital dealings and ask ...
We hear from two Nobel laureates, Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz, about the US recovery, whether austerity has worked, and the role of global inequality in suppressing demand. Also in the programme, Celia Hatton reports from Beijing on the surprising way in which the Swedish furniture chain Ikea has ...
Africa has vast mineral resources, huge supplies of oil and gas, great fertile plains, but is in terms of per capita income still the poorest continent. We ask why. Also in the programme, Simon Jack speaks to the chairman of Standard Chartered, Sir John Peace, about why the British bank still does business ...
Aluminium is the metal that just keeps on giving. In everything from drinks cans to car bodies, it can be recycled again and again. So could we one day stop mining it altogether?
Iraq - a security nightmare for business or a land of commercial opportunity? We have an exclusive report from Baghdad about a group of British companies assessing the prospects. We hear from founder of pressure group, Out on the Street, Todd Sears, about the push for more change in the financial world ...
How do you change attitudes to way the financial system operates or to poor global sanitation worldwide - we examine two very different approaches. And we've also got a singing toilet called Louie the loo, part of a new campaign to celebrate the inauguration of the first World Toilet Day. Plus why openly ...
Russia has incredible mineral wealth, vast supplies of oil and gas, and great fertile plains, yet in the last two weeks it has almost halved its long-term growth forecast. Justin Rowlatt challenges his guests to explain what's wrong with Russia. Why can't it live up to its potential? A recent report ...
Could "catastrophe bonds" alleviate the cost to developing nations of natural disasters such as Typhoon Haiyan in the future? Also in the programme, we speak to the head of Germany's state development agency. And Lucy Kellaway presents part 7 of her history of the office.
Today Business Daily meets some of the most charismatic characters in the most glamorous industry on earth - fashion. We speak to fasion designer - Sir Paul Smith, Tamara Mellor - the woman behind Jimmy Choo and Micky Drexler of J. Crew - the man who built the Gap brand.
Today is the second part of Business Daily's series looking at the world economy through the chemical elements, and we are looking at helium. It is the second most abundant element in the universe but very rare on earth. Professor Andrea Sella of University College London explains to Justin Rowlatt the ...
Today on Business Daily we ask when changes in the weather become evidence of climate change. We hear from young European migrants who have fled unemployment in what were once rich European nations only to join the exploited underclass in Australia. Meanwhile Monday was so-called "singles day" in China ...
What are China's leaders cooking up in their private meeting in Beijing? Plus, the big ideas from a blue skies conference in Berlin. And we've got a typically robust piece from Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times on why abuse delivered in person is the best way to get a business to change direction.
In the Balance makes its annual pilgrimage to Kilkenomics, the economics and comedy festival in Ireland. The country's got the green light this week to come out of the measures imposed by its bailout three years ago. Surely that's good news? Jamie Robertson and his brace of economic thinkers, David ...
As the London Metals Exchange announces new rules to cut unprecedented year-long queues at aluminium warehouses, we ask what all the fuss is about. Also in the programe, Lucy Kellaway takes a close look at the art of management in part six of her history of the office.
Business Daily sets sail into one of the world's biggest and least talked about industries - international shipping.
We visit London Gateway, the first major new port development in London for almost a century, a harbour capable of taking the very biggest ships in the world. How significant is it that ...
Please wait...