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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

As Congress cuts a last-minute deal to avert an imminent US debt default, Manuela Saragosa asks whether the crisis is really over, or has it merely been postponed? And have the machinations in Washington done lasting damage to America's international standing as a financial safe haven? Simon Jack reports ...
Today's Business Daily explores that most alluring of pursuits - the hunt for hidden treasure. Yes, you really can make a living searching for wrecks laden with gold and silver - but don't expect it to be easy. And from pirate booty to booty calls: we explore the links between sex, love and money with ...
Business Daily dispenses with the business bit of our role - today we're reporting on alternative economies. Plus we explore the risks - and benefits - of sharing a business with your nearest and dearest.
How might the US explain its debt ceiling standoff to its lenders, and what does its biggest creditor, China, make of it all? Also in today's programme, Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times takes a dim view of those co-workers who offer their time and services for free.
Have you ever heard of Nezahualcoyotl? No? Find out how this medieval Mexican poet inspired the programme to ask if America's economic crown is slipping. Manuela Saragosa and her guests, Edward Alden of the Council on Foreign Relations, Mthuli Ncube, Chief Economist and Vice President of the African ...
As the US government shutdown continues and the debt ceiling deadline looms, Andrew Walker goes to Washington DC to meet the protagonists and hear a plea from the World Bank head.
As traders deploy cutting-edge technology to gain an edge on financial markets, how close are they to trading at the speed of light, and can regulators can keep up? Also in the programme, we speak to the head of American pizza chain Papa John's, John Schnatter, and ask him how he got started, and whether ...
As Janet Yellen is nominated to become the first woman to be put in charge of US monetary policy at the Federal Reserve, we ask Angel Gurria, secretary general of the OECD, what the world can expect from her.
Plus Mr Gurria, and Olivier Blanchard, chief economist of the International Monetary Fund, ...
We speak to Prof Paul Collier, author of a new book that argues the rich world has a duty towards the developing world - a duty not to drain it of its best and brightest talent. Also in the programme, advertising executive and blogger Dave Trott serves up a short history of the Michelin Guide. And we ...
As all 21 leaders of the Apec nations - all except Barack Obama - gather in Bali, Linda Yueh reports on Indonesia's hopes, Asia's rise and whether the planet can cope. Also in the programme, Lucy Kellaway provides a salutary warning about cyber-comparisons.
Later this month Republicans and Democrats need to agree to raise the limit on the amount of money the US can borrow. That's necessary not just to keep the American government running but also to ensure it can pay back its debts. But is the US government shutdown just a prelude to what's to come? And ...
As Washington ponders possible calamity, a former FBI negotiator offers lessons on deal-making. And Lucy Kellaway recalls the first woman to work at the Bank of England.
Do new technologies such as 3D printers and self-driving cars promise to relieve us of the humdrum of work, or to relieve us of our employment altogether? We speak to two Oxford academics who claim that half of all jobs in the US are at threat from the coming horde of computers and robots. We get up ...
Big business now actively seeks out hackers to help guard their data, parents look for kit to keep track of their kids and can the secret services keep up, in the internet age?
We delve into demographics: The UN forecasts that the world's population will reach 11 billion by the end of this century - but can Planet Earth feed that many mouths?
Is Australian Coal Seam Gas the new fracking? Plus our regular columnist Lucy Kellaway looks at whether viral acts of revenge work.
We're down on the farm with a vist to one of Europe's biggest agricultural trade shows in County Laois in Ireland. Against the background of the country's national ploughing championships, Manuela Saragosa and her guests put our dependence on the land under the spotlight. Duck farmer Stuart Steele, and ...
Should we be worried about whether China's new leadership is capable of tackling the country's seemingly endemic corruption and its mounting debts? Also in the programme, part three of Lucy Kellaway's history of the office looks at the invention of the career ladder.
Will oil and coal reserves never be dug up due to fears about climate change, and are energy firms therefore massively overvalued by the financial markets?
Venezuela, one of the world's biggest oil producers, faces spiralling inflation and food shortages as the economy lurches into crisis. But why?
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