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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

How do you change attitudes to way the financial system operates or to poor global sanitation worldwide - we examine two very different approaches. And we've also got a singing toilet called Louie the loo, part of a new campaign to celebrate the inauguration of the first World Toilet Day. Plus why openly ...
Russia has incredible mineral wealth, vast supplies of oil and gas, and great fertile plains, yet in the last two weeks it has almost halved its long-term growth forecast. Justin Rowlatt challenges his guests to explain what's wrong with Russia. Why can't it live up to its potential? A recent report ...
Could "catastrophe bonds" alleviate the cost to developing nations of natural disasters such as Typhoon Haiyan in the future? Also in the programme, we speak to the head of Germany's state development agency. And Lucy Kellaway presents part 7 of her history of the office.
Today Business Daily meets some of the most charismatic characters in the most glamorous industry on earth - fashion. We speak to fasion designer - Sir Paul Smith, Tamara Mellor - the woman behind Jimmy Choo and Micky Drexler of J. Crew - the man who built the Gap brand.
Today is the second part of Business Daily's series looking at the world economy through the chemical elements, and we are looking at helium. It is the second most abundant element in the universe but very rare on earth. Professor Andrea Sella of University College London explains to Justin Rowlatt the ...
Today on Business Daily we ask when changes in the weather become evidence of climate change. We hear from young European migrants who have fled unemployment in what were once rich European nations only to join the exploited underclass in Australia. Meanwhile Monday was so-called "singles day" in China ...
What are China's leaders cooking up in their private meeting in Beijing? Plus, the big ideas from a blue skies conference in Berlin. And we've got a typically robust piece from Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times on why abuse delivered in person is the best way to get a business to change direction.
In the Balance makes its annual pilgrimage to Kilkenomics, the economics and comedy festival in Ireland. The country's got the green light this week to come out of the measures imposed by its bailout three years ago. Surely that's good news? Jamie Robertson and his brace of economic thinkers, David ...
As the London Metals Exchange announces new rules to cut unprecedented year-long queues at aluminium warehouses, we ask what all the fuss is about. Also in the programe, Lucy Kellaway takes a close look at the art of management in part six of her history of the office.
Business Daily sets sail into one of the world's biggest and least talked about industries - international shipping.
We visit London Gateway, the first major new port development in London for almost a century, a harbour capable of taking the very biggest ships in the world. How significant is it that ...
Life depends on phosphorous yet supply is short and dominated by one nation. Business Daily's new series looks at the world economy from the perspective of the chemical elements. Justin Rowlatt speaks to chemist Professor Andrea Sella to find out why phosphorous is vital to all life, and to modern agriculture. ...
As Twitter prepares to float for as much as 17 billion dollars, we ask are we in the midst of another tech bubble? Our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones takes a look at the company's USP. And and we hear from Aswath Damodaran, finance professor at New York University's Stern Scholl of Business, ...
Have the big banks been rigging the international currency markets? We delve into the latest allegations against the club of big institutions that dominate global capital markets. Also in the programme, Evan Davis interviews the American author and intellectual Malcolm Gladwell about his latest book, ...
This week the programme heads to Cambridge for the university's Festival of Ideas to look for inspiration on new ways to solve old economic problems. Manuela Saragosa and her guests ask whether we'll always be condemned to economic cycles of boom and bust. Plus we head to the Orchard Tea Rooms in the ...
The US territory of Puerto Rico is struggling to avoid defaulting on its debts. We ask Alan Schankel of the wealth management firm Janney Montgommery Scott how serious the country's debt problems are.
We also look at debt woes in another corner of the planet - China.
And Justin Rowlatt speaks to the ...
We visit Italy, where many young people say the only place they can get a job is on the black market.
Plus, should older workers give up their jobs to make room for the young? We get the view of the International Labour Organisation.
And with the bust-up between MacDonalds and Heinz, Matt Wells tells ...
There is one corner of Iraq that is relatively free of car bombings and kidnappings - the autonomous and oil-rich northern province Kurdistan. We sent our Middle East Correspondent Kevin Connolly to investigate. Also in the programe, could pathologists be the latest profession to fall foul of the computer ...
A hundred years after the construction of the Panama canal, a project to widen it is underway. But will this 5 billion dollar project deliver the results which had been hoped for? Also in the programme, Sarah Rainsford reports from Cuba on why the government's new reforms make life tough for shopkeepers ...
With house prices creeping up in hot spots around the world, what is the risk of a global housing bubble of the sort which caused the credit crunch crisis of 2008? And is self-confidence always an advantage? Lucy Kellaway isn't so sure.
Bangladesh has the lowest wage garment economy in the world and is still reeling from a catastrophic factory building collapse six months ago in which more than 1130 people died. Most of them have received little or no long term compensation for the deaths of their relatives or their own injuries. ...
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