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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Why Mexico is now importing more workers than it's exporting. Is it taking over from China as a cheap labour market to satisfy demand from US consumers? We'll hear from workers who've come home and from employers creating thousands of new jobs. We'll also look at how much of a threat continuing violence ...
In the Balance looks at the road to recovery after the financial crash of 2008. How the world's richest,and some of the world's poorest, have been affected by the crisis in capitalism. Are debt and austerity still the most important economic topics of the moment?
We review some of the most colourful trips of our broadcasting year. From shoppers scrabbling for bargains on the empty supermarket shelves of Venezuela, to high-rolling gamblers in Macau for whom the sky is the limit, from the garment workers surviving tragedy in Bangladesh, to the herdsmen of Mongolia, ...
What are Alan Greenspan's thoughts on dancing? What does Kofi Annan dream about? And can Lloyd Blankfein explain why banks have been so reluctant to lend? A look back at our most significant interviews of 2013. Business Daily sat down with the central bankers, chief executives and presidents that move ...
Business Daily revisits the weirdest and most wonderful stories of the year. We speak to the officer tasked with investigating a "grime" wave and learn why psychopaths make such good bosses as well as meeting the expert in "inactivity studies" who wants to tackle our sedentary working lives by making ...
The computer gaming industry is worth over $70bn worldwide, yet it can be surprisingly difficult for games developers to make a profit from their fans.
Are women the key to turning around Japan's fortunes? Fewer than half of all Japanese women work. We'll be hearing from one of the two female cabinet ministers on how the government is determined to change all that plus we'll hear from one of the few venture venture capitalist who actually invest in ...
Permits which give companies and industries the right to pollute are traded around the world. As China opens the world's second biggest carbon trading scheme, In the Balance asks whether the system is working.
Manuela Saragosa is joined by international environmental lawyer Anthony Hobley; Dimitri Zenghelis ...
How can we help the 73 million young people around the world who can't find work? We report from Spain and India. Plus we'll be exploring what can be done to get young people back into work and to ameliorate the effects of a spell out of work.
The US Fed's wind-down of quantitative easing - what does it mean for China and other developing countries, and what does it say about the US economy? Also in the programme, should everyone be entitled to a minimum basic income, guaranteed by the state?
We meet Dr Henry Markram, the man who has bagged the biggest scientific grant ever awarded - 1bn euros - to build a virtual human brain. Also in the programme, chess boxing, a hybrid sport that combines chess with boxing in alternating rounds.
Computers and our world: Estonia, YouTube and the sticky bun. How innovation in computers continues to alter our reality. Plus: one of the founders of YouTube on a digital paradox: why the companies that design global technology insist on basing themselves in Silicon Valley.
Japanese PM Shinzo Abe's economic policies are one year old, so what has been achieved? The BBC's Chief Business Correspondent Linda Yueh is in Tokyo to talk to former Economics Minister and Abe advisor, Heizo Takenaka, who remains optimistic; while Richard Koo of the Nomura Research Institute highlights ...
This week we're talking people, power and economics. We've seen people in Ukraine, Thailand, and of course South Africa, making their voices heard. It's been for different reasons, but money and livelihoods have been at the heart of their concerns. But when a government listens and takes a populist ...
What can be done to revive South Africa's ailing economy? Growth is slow, unemployment is high and it remains one of the most unequal countries on earth. Plus we visit a high tech energy firm called Moixa to explore whether a new kind of USB cable can drive a revolution in how we use power. And self-dissing. ...
After two years of draconian austerity measures, the Greek economy is finally showing signs of recovery. The stock market's done well this year and the government is balancing the books. Now the country needs growth, but where's that going to come from? And if you're running a business in Greece, does ...
We take a look at gold in the fifth of our series examining the world economy from the chemical elements up. We discover why gold is golden, why it is the only element that makes a good currency and why currencies based on the gold standard were such a disaster. We talk to one of the world's biggest ...
One of the world's most influential economists says worldwide health care improvements could save 10 million lives a year. Larry Summers tells us how he believes, it can be done. And why, despite increasingly challenging economic conditions, China remains a great place to do business, according to the ...
As shale oil and gas revolutionises US energy, we find out about the fracking pioneers. Also in the programme, we hear from the BBC's Stephen Evans in Berlin about how Germany's U-turn over nuclear energy following Japan's Fukushima disaster has led to a controversial rebound in coal-fired power stations ...
Today Business Daily is in Texas and finds it is in the grip of a new oil boom made possible by fracking. But is a great opportunity being missed? And we've got Lucy Kellaway on how the scandal of the drug-taking chairman of a British bank, reveals serious flaws in the competence of many company directors.
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