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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Can Europe's economy continue to deliver rising living standards, and does the EU face political crisis if it cannot? We hear from France where the government is seeking to push for an even more leisurely work-life balance. And Presenter Manuela Saragosa speaks to author Philippe Legrain, who predicts ...
Ed Butler presents an in-depth report from India, as the world’s most populous democracy goes to the polls. The programme features Sameer Kochhar, biographer of BJP leader Narendra Modi, and development economist and Modi critic Jayati Ghosh. Also, the electoral significance of water shortages and corruption.
As President Obama visits Japan, where he will be negotiating over the TPP, a free trade area poised to cover large parts of the Americas and East Asia, the BBC's Chief Business Correspondent Linda Yueh explains the potential benefits. But why is China not involved? Also, the Director-General of the ...
If you thought the reputation of the world's bankers could go no lower then get ready: it’s now claimed that traders at some of the world's biggest banks have been rigging the biggest financial market of them all, the foreign exchange market. That's where the values of the world's currencies are set. ...
Simon Jack asks if we're in a stock market bubble that's set to burst, particularly in the technology sector? Michelle Fleury reports from New York. Also, how the US handles its top footballers' finances. Dr John York, owner of the San Francisco 49ers, gives Simon some ballpark figures...
Rory Cellan-Jones presents a technology special about the Chinese micro-blogging service Weibo, and a potential revival in the idea of social WiFi
In the Balance examines office hierarchy. If some of the latest buzz about the 21st century workplace is to be believed, old-style vertical management structure is dead. Or is it? Are such rumours greatly exaggerated? An anthropologist, a business school prof and a so-called envisioner from Microsoft, ...
Justin Rowlatt tours a distillery to learn about the process of making Scotch Whisky. He hears how the sector has adapted to changing markets worldwide and the importance for it of links to the EU. The shadow minister for trade and investment argues that “no” a vote in the Scottish independence referendum ...
Chlorine is more than just swimming pools and gas attacks. This poisonous green gas is the great enabling element of the chemicals industry, helping to create your clothes, computer chips, medicines, flooring...
Justin Rowlatt travels discovers the brutal process of extracting the chlorine from the ...
We go inside Cambodia's border casinos to hear stories from players and workers describing imprisonment, torture and gambling addiction. Also, we consider the role of good luck in business investing with financial strategist Michael Mauboussin. Plus, on the day that Google announce the takeover of a ...
What's the fall-out for the Russian economy, as Ukraine accuses Moscow of orchestrating violent unrest? We get the thoughts of John Lough of London's Chatham House. We also speak to "Monsieur Jacques", the French businessman who some say played a big part in bringing down South Africa's apartheid regime. ...
India needs to create about 100 million new jobs over the next decade to meet the needs of its vast and growing population. As the largest democracy in the world goes to the polls this week In the Balance focuses on the future of work for young people who currently make up about 65% of the population. ...
An exclusive interview with German finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble who talks about how Europe's blighted economies are doing. Also on the programme 25 years after communism's fall in Poland, Tanya Beckett meets people there who are making the most of the opportunities offered by being in the EU and ...
Business Daily comes to you from Delhi where elections are seen by many as a potential turning point for the country. An economic slowdown has brought hardship for some people here. Others are angry about what is seen as a rising tide of corruption. Presenter, Ed Butler tests the mood amongst electors ...
In our series examining the world economy from the perspective of the chemical elements, we are looking at the extraordinary properties of lithium. Thirty years ago it wasn't reckoned to be that useful. Now it powers so many of the gadgets we now take for granted and may soon even replace the gasoline ...
Samsung, the world's largest maker of mobile phones, braces for a drop in its annual profit. One commentator tells us the electronics giant has a lot of scope to cut costs. Also, as countries prepare for an IMF meeting in Washington, economist Jim O'Neil explains why the US is being accused of dragging ...
An In the Balance debate discusses the proposition: 'Allowing free movement of workers across borders would boost the global economy.' Co-hosted by Justin Rowlatt and Manuela Saragosa, in front of an audience in London, In the Balance asks what are the benefits and dangers of allowing people to move ...
Does big data have big problems? We ask what companies are doing with the avalanche of digital information all of us leave in our wake. Microsoft's economics researcher David Rothschild tells what big data is used for and that it's not always useful in making predictions. Also, the BBC's Rahul Tandon ...
Bio-tech start-ups: How hard is it for them to attract finance? It is a high risk industry, with the large majority of new drugs failing to make it all the way to market. So where do cutting-edge researchers find the financing they need to commercialise their work? Also in the programme, we hear from ...
What's the point of owning a football club? It costs a packet and your team will probably lose anyway. But there are gains, beyond the trophies. We find out what they are from Simon Chadwick, Professor of Sport at Coventry University who gives us a costs/benefits analysis, while Carole Stone author of ...
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