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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

Joseph Stiglitz explains why he thinks the gap between rich and poor has grown so wide.
Also Marie Keyworth reports from Haifa in Israel on how the local heavy industry has sparked a health scare.
Marie Keyworth speaks to a paper manufacturer, an accountant working for the Palestinian Authority and an American-Palestinian businessman, among others, about the headaches of doing business in the occupied West Bank. The territory's economy must handle everything from prolonged delays at checkpoints ...
Almost a year after the conflict with Israel, the BBC's Marie Keyworth reports from Gaza looking at the economy there and how ordinary Gazans are getting by. And as technology entrepreneurs and investors meet at the University of Oxford's Said Business School for the Silicon Valley in Oxford conference, ...
Bond markets are supposed to be boring. They're usually very predictable but in the past month bond prices have staged sharp drops. Gareth Isaac, fixed income fund manager at the investment house Schroders in London, explains what's going on and what it tells us about where the economy is heading. Also, ...
As India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi visits China, we ask his official biographer Lance Price what he's like as a leader. Also, should we fear robots? Zoe Kleinman spends the night in a house staffed entirely by them, while James Srodes considers which jobs are at risk of automation.
The world's population is getting older. By the year 2050, nearly two billion people on the planet will be 60 or over. So who's going to look after them all? Mariko Oi reports from Japan on its experience with a rapidly ageing population, while Anu Anand hears from several generations of the same family ...
US Arctic Oil: Is Washington's call to allow exploration off Alaska's Coast worthwhile or too risky? A former President of the Shell Oil Company, John Hofmeister, weighs up the issues, as well as a leading UK marine biologist, Dr Simon Boxall, Lecturer in Ocean and Earth Science at the University of ...
Baltimore: Did economics create the conditions for the riots, or was it partly down to lead-based paint? We consider some less well known challenges facing America's urban poor. We hear from one inspiring urban campaigner, Munir Bahar, who says the black community needs to do more to help itself, and ...
The Greek government is facing intense pressure to do a deal quickly on terms that the eurozone will accept, but at home is being told that it cannot renege on its promises to end austerity. We hear from some of the people of Thessaloniki who reflect a general mood of pessimism. Also we get the view ...
What does David Cameron's return as Prime Minister of Britain mean economically and for business in the UK? Will the planned vote on Britain's EU membership lead to months of uncertainty? And we look at the longer-term economic implications of this historic election with a panel that reflects its global ...
Unemployment in Europe remains a stubborn problem and nowhere more so than at the very heart of Europe - Brussels. Up to 20 percent of adults in Belgium's capital city are out of work. Tanya Beckett reports from Brussels on the extent of youth unemployment - and initiatives to help young immigrants ...
The man US authorities accuse of causing a massive collapse in financial markets five years ago is in court again in London for a bail hearing. But many in financial markets are asking how a single trader can wield so much power? Is it a case of regulators not keeping up with the rapidly evolving technology ...
How much do crowd-funding, electronic currencies, peer-to-peer and other forms of FinTech lending, threaten to disrupt the traditional banking model? The BBC's Simon Jack, reporting live from London's FinTech hub, Level39, speaks to the founder of London car parking app JustPark, the head of hi-tech ...
Why are global sales of vinyl records rising again after decades of decline? Edwin Lane reports from one of the few remaining record pressing plants in the Netherlands. Plus we hear from Swedish songwriter and musician Helienne Lindvall on the rise of music streaming sites like Spotify, and the impact ...
What do we do when the antibiotics we rely on to cure deadly diseases stop working? A growing number of infections like malaria and TB are renewed killers because new strains of the diseases no longer respond to antibiotics. The World Health Organisation this week calls it the single greatest challenge ...
Obesity and malnutrition may not at first thought have much in common yet as Katy Watson in Mexico City discovers the two are both part of a similar problem - one which presents very different challenges. Mexico has the highest rates of child obesity in the world and the economy is struggling to cope ...
We find out why trolling has become as much a feature of the internet as videos of cute kittens. Author Jon Ronson, who's just published his latest book So You've Been Publicly Shamed, tells us about people who have suffered persistent online abuse and gives advice on what to do if you become the target ...
Earlier this week the United Nations published its flagship report into the status of women in the global economy. It painted a global picture in which women were, on average, paid less, working more and missing out on a pension. We speak to Aongus Hegarty, president of Europe, Middle East and Africa ...
Business Daily looks at the boom in African investment. $80 billion went into the continent last year, close to the all-time record, and it's predicted that 13 of the world's 20 fastest growing economies over the next five years will be African. So what's going on? The optimists say an emerging middle ...
After the failure of last Friday's talks in Riga between Greece and its creditors, we speak to Francesco Papadia, a former insider at the European Central Bank, about his view of the eurozone debt crisis. Could the ECB be left holding the Greek tab? Also, we look at the way FC Midtjylland, a Danish football ...
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