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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

2022 World Cup: Has Qatar done enough to improve the conditions of migrants working on its football construction projects? We speak to Nicholas McGheehan of Human Rights Watch who has seen their working and living conditions first-hand. Also, Professor Amartya Sen, Nobel prize-winning economist, tells ...
The dollar dropped as the US Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen indicated her patience with its strength was wearing thin - but what does it mean for the US economy and for currency markets? Manuela Saragosa hears from BBC business correspondent Simon Jack, and from strategist Bill Blain of brokerage ...
In the first of three programmes about iron, Justin Rowlatt explores two moments in industrial history that transformed this most abundant of metal elements into the key material out of which modern life is constructed. And they both took place right here in the British Isles.
South America's biggest nation faces drought, scandal and slowdown. Yet until recently, Brazil was considered to be one of the world's most promising emerging markets. What's gone wrong? We have a report from the BBC's South America correspondent Daniel Gallas. Also, what Greece can learn from Israel ...
Are billions of dollars in international flows of dirty money lying buried deep in the trade statistics of developed countries such as the UK? Also, we hear from Houston about how the US funds its arts scene. And should we celebrate the office curmudgeon?
In the face of an ever changing employment market, and a workforce that is not only globalised but also increasingly technology driven, what kind of education works to equip today's students for the workplaces of the future? And what does business need? We hear from a panel of educational experts including ...
Motor car racing is an expensive sport, so how do F1 teams make ends meet? Manuela Saragosa speaks to leading Formula 1 academic Mark Jenkins of Cranfield University to find out.
We also dispatch Briohny Williams to visit her namesake team - Williams - to discover how its cutting edge technology is helping ...
The BBC's economics correspondent Andrew Walker explains why the euro has weakened against the dollar and what it means for the eurozone. Also, Slavoj Zizek, a cultural theorist, Marxist philosopher and international director at the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in London, looks at what the eurozone ...
Technetium is essential for medical imaging, yet supplies of this short-lived manmade element are far from guaranteed. We see a technetium scan in progress and a cow being milked, and hear the yarn of the 70-year chemistry wild goose chase sparked by this mysterious radioactive metal.
Business Daily today looks at some of the more breath-taking aspects of modern technological change: from a Dutch project aiming to 3-D print an entire house, to a planned high-speed train, being propelled through a vacuum tube. Can it be done and in the wake of robot manufacturing, where will such high-tech ...
Europe launches its quantitative easing programme today - a full six years after Britain and America launched theirs. But will it help the eurozone? We get the view of Gabriel Sterne, Head of Global Macro Research at Oxford Economics. Also we speak to Uwe L├╝bbermann, founder of the German based company, ...
Does Islamic extremism have a 'business model'? Can economics explain how groups like Islamic State manage to recruit privileged, well-educated young Muslims into their ranks?
Sexism in Silicon Valley: It's International Women's Day this weekend and this year's slogan is Make it Happen. Can women "make it happen" in the technology sector? We talk to Eric Ries, a Silicon Valley investor, entrepreneur and author, about whether there is a "boy's club" culture in technology. Also, ...
China forecasts an official economic growth rate of 7 per cent this year; what's slowing it down? The BBC's chief business correspondent, Linda Yueh, reports from Shanghai. Also, Jeremy Leggett, chairman of the research group Carbon Tracker Initiative, and founder of the British solar energy company ...
Fluorine is itself a ferocious yellow gas, but is also the key building block for a string of other gases that pose a threat to mankind if released into the atmosphere. From the ozone-depleting CFCs to potent greenhouse gases such as sulphur hexafluoride, Justin Rowlatt gets the full rundown from Professor ...
A special edition of Business Daily discusses what it takes for a foreign business to break into China. How do foreign businesses get China right? What are the pitfalls? What are the things you need to know?

With an invited audience and a panel of guests including Linda Yueh, chief business correspondent, ...
As Samsung unveils its new Galaxy S6, we ask what it takes to compete in the mobile market? The BBC's Rory Cellan Jones reports from the World Mobile Congress in Barcelona whewre he's been speaking to David Kang, Samsung's vice president of marketing, and to Stuart Miles, founder of gadget news site ...
Worth over 88 billion dollars world-wide, the film industry has never been more potent; but is the success of film in Asia and Africa now changing how Hollywood does its business? We hear from Nollywood, Bollywood and Hollywood; and we hear about the new 'superpower struggle' between the film sectors ...
Money: Does it make us happy? Does it even motivate us? Or does it turn us into sociopaths? Laurence Knight finds out as he speaks to psychologists Dacher Keltner of the University of California in Berkeley, and Dan Ariely of Duke University, as well as to Brookings Institution economist Carol Graham. ...
How will markets and the economy weather rising interest rates and the end of quantitative easing? We speak to Randall Kroszner, former member of the Federal Reserve board. Also, the BBC's Kim Gittleson travels to the southern US city of Chattanooga in Tennessee, where traditional organised labour is ...
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