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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

After MH370 and MH17, what does the history of aeroplane disasters tell us about Malaysia Airlines' commercial prospects? Manuela Saragosa speaks to an airline safety expert. Also, in a lighter vein, flip-flops and economics, plus India and soap operas.
Sweden is famed for its welfare state. But the country's social model has its critics, as Manuela Saragosa finds out in Stockholm. She hears how some people think too much equality is a bad thing, while at a soup kitchen, she sees how there’s still plenty of poverty. All that plus Swedish style – and stress.
Norway is an oil producer famed for fish, Grieg and high living standards. So how did it avoid the "resources curse" - that is, spiralling inflation afflicting many petro-economies that spend their oil wealth on themselves? Manuela Saragosa travels to Bergen in the first of two programmes looking at ...
How much do traffic jams cost an economy? From the road-enraged of Calcutta to the rain-soaked of Tunisia, we discover the true cost of congestion.
This week Colm O’Regan, In the Balance regular contributor, stand-up comedian and farmer’s son, presents a special In the Balance looking at the future of food. Will we be able to feed the 9 and a half billion people that the UN says will be on the planet by 2050? And if so, which technologies will ...
Film-making is an increasingly globalised industry, with cinema receipts no longer dominated by the US market. How is Hollywood adapting? What are the opportunities for other countries outside the US? And how can small, independent film-makers compete? Ed Butler asks the questions.
Financial lawsuits, banking crises and economic stagnation - can they all be solved by throwing more money at the problem, and if so where does it come from?
With the Eurozone recovery stalling, we take a health-check on the countries hardest hit by the bloc's economic crisis - Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain - dubbed the PIIGS by economists. Our reporters offer snapshots from each of the five countries trying to revive their economies and get ...
2014 is on track to be the biggest year for mergers and acquisitions in a decade. Global expansion is on the cards for Western companies keen to get into Asia and also Asian companies and investors who are going global. Linda Yueh in Singapore hears from the CEOs of luxury goods company Bulgari, Banyan ...
While the US economy edges back towards growth, a new report highlights the problems of mounting public debt there. Debt levels are now almost twice what they were at the start of the financial crisis. Also, from Senegal, a new project aiming to get girls into high tech, and Lucy Kellaway on the holiday ...
Making money from products with a controversial image is the topic for Evan Davis and his guests who represent companies selling drugs and sex toys. These companies are testing our morals and the regulations set up to protect them. So how do you market products that many people disapprove of? And how ...
Millions of cars all over the world have been recalled by their manufacturers in the past few years. What does that tell us about the state of the automotive industry?
The iconic waterway – which links the Pacific and Atlantic oceans - has been of huge importance for global trade and for the Panamanian economy.
The English, Spanish, and German leagues all kick off soon. But will there be much real sport to cheer? With smaller clubs complaining of the growing gulf with the big spenders, we ask what Europe's soccer leagues can learn from American football? Also in the programme, Jeremy Wagstaffe reflects on the ...
Business Daily travels to California where the worst drought in four decades is hitting farmers hard. Peter Vallis of the San Joaquin Valley Winegrowers Association tells us the long-term toll drought is taking on the Californian wine industry, plus why a small amount of drought may improve wine quality ...
As the conflict in Ukraine grows, Kiev is debating further sanctions, including the disruption of Russian gas exports to Europe. Could Russia or the EU afford that? Also in the programme, a report from Calcutta on why Bengalis are turning away from Bollywood and western films and watching their own cinema ...
A report from northern Sweden hears how Europe's most ancient indigenous culture is taking on the forces of industry. But in a struggle between the miners and the Sami reindeer-herders, who is likely to win? Also in the programme, trillions of dollars have gone to support US banks following the financial ...
This week we consider the future of learning with Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales.

We ask just what Wikipedia - and the rise of the internet - has meant for the way we learn and teach.

Alongside Jimmy is Professor Diana Strassman, Economist at Rice University and Chair of The Wiki Education Foundation; ...
We get the view from Russia on what shoppers make of Moscow's trade embargo on western food imports. Is this just the start of a wider trade war with the west? And we speak to American journalist Jeffrey Rothfeder who got an inside view of car manufacturer Honda. Is Honda - and not Toyota - the Japanese ...
Water shortages are becoming a problem everywhere, and companies are taking note. So how should we value water? Is the answer in trading it as a commodity? And speaking of shortages, James Hassam, the BBC's Ethiopia correspondent, considers a shortage of imported butter in the capital Addis Ababa.
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