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BBC Business Daily: Episodes

How new technologies are being used as never before, to make managing disaster events more efficient, making communications and aid delivery possible, as never before.
The controversies over fracking - extracting oil from the rocks - in the US. Meeting the energy needs of the developing world and China's role in the renewable energy business.
The solutions used tackle climate change are failing because they cling to the old norms of economic analysis. So says Naomi Klein in her new book. Is she right? Rahul Tandon reports on a new Indian football league. And Lucy Kellaway considers the notion of taking as much holiday as you can afford. Sounds ...
In the Balance is drilling for oil - or rather for some explanations of what's been happening to prices: why have they been falling when the Middle East is in turmoil? After all, conflict in the region has often been the spark for sharp rises in the price of crude oil.
Andrew Walker is joined by Seth ...
Malawi in southern Africa, is a country recently rocked by scandal. Tens of millions of dollars of government money was being skimmed from the national budget - some of it supplied by foreign donors. As a result, the donors have stopped funding the government altogether. So what is the effect of this ...
Business Daily comes from Brussels - the heart of the European Union - where in the last day we have discovered that the new commissioner for internal market and services will be Britain's Lord Hill. Tanya Beckett hears from the man currently doing that job, Michel Barnier, as well as influential economist, ...
Uranium is the fuel for nuclear power stations, which generate carbon-free electricity, but also highly radioactive waste, posing a major dilemma for environmentalists.
Uranium is the fuel for nuclear power stations, which generate carbon-free electricity, but also radioactive waste thats lasts millennia. In the latest in our series looking at the world economy from the perspective of the elements of the periodic table, Justin Rowlatt visits Sizewell nuclear power station, ...
A former employee of the New York Federal Reserve releases secret recordings of her colleagues, raising questions about the methods being used by the NY Fed to regulate the banks. And our regular commentator James Srodes considers life after the telephone landline.
Economies are growing again and optimism about future growth is picking up... so why is it that the world's debt mountain continues to grow, despite these positive factors? And if business gibberish is something which you find impenetrable, our regular commentator Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times agrees.
Many regard Hong Kong as China's bridge to the wider global economy, but is that still the case now that Hong Kong's economy is dwarfed by that of its giant neighbour? Economically and financially, how much does Hong Kong still matter to China these days? Joining the discussion are Hong Kong-based independent ...
Brazil's election: what do voters, workers, economists and businesspeople make of the race between incumbent Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and Socialist challenger Marina Silva?
Poverty in India: New PM Narendra Modi said he would prioritise toilets over temples, but is lack of water, sanitation and other public services the country's biggest challenge?
Lead is the sweetest of poisons, blamed for everything from mad Roman emperors to modern-day crime waves. Yet a lead-acid battery is still what gets your car going in the morning. So have we finally learnt how to handle this heavyweight element?
The boss of the world's biggest insulin maker talks about new treatments and prevention for diabetes; and should sugary drinks be taxed to tackle this killer disease? And international brand names may be a familiar sight around the world. But in Ethiopia they are not always what they seem.
After dramatic protests about democracy in Hong Kong, we get an assessment from the BBC's Chief Business Correspondent Linda Yueh of what it means for the territory's economic future? As the British Conservative party holds its annual conference, the prospect of the UK leaving the European Union is on ...
Following the major United Nations climate gathering in New York - we ask if the summit's premise - that economic growth is compatible with protecting the environment - is right? Manuela Saragosa and guests : Jennifer Turner, China environment expert at the Wilson Center in Washington DC, Shreekant ...
Silicon Valley's Peter Thiel tells us we are living in an age of technological stagnation; we should be more aggressive in pursuing discoveries that challenge death and ageing.
Forex rigging: Is manipulation of the global currency markets the next big scandal to engulf the banking industry? The way financial benchmarks are being calculated is being scrutinised by regulators across the globe. Banks have already faced big fines over the Libor scandal, but what is next? Lesley ...
The atomic clock runs on caesium, and has redefined the very meaning of time. But it has also introduced a bug into timekeeping that affects everything from computerised financial markets to electricity grids to satellite navigation to the Greenwich Meridian.
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