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Best of Today: Episodes

EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso has warned that Denmark's decision to reintroduce border controls may violate European law. Senator Lucio Malan of the Italian Peoples Freedom Party and MEP Claude Moraes debate the future of the Schengen agreement on open borders.
Following hot on the heels of BBC4's hit series The Killing, Jussi Adler-Olsen's bestseller Mercy is published in English for the first time this week. The Danish author is joined by John Lloyd, contributing editor of the Financial Times, to determine why there seems to be such an abundance of exciting ...
Pop star George Michael has apologised for being a bad role model for young gay people, as he prepares to tour again for the first time in three years. Writer and commentator Matthew Parris and John Amechi, the first openly gay NBA player, discuss whether prominent members of the gay community need to ...
A report into the UK Border Agency has found failings in the way intelligence about illegal immigrants is acted on. Immigration minister Damian Green responds to the criticisms.
Can the economic boom in Germany continue into 2011? Holger Schmieding, chief economist at Germany's oldest private bank, explains why the country is doing so well. And our Friday boss is Peter Marks, chief executive of the Co-operative Group.
Is classical music irrelevant to the youth of today? In a dress rehearsal of a debate at the Cambridge Union this evening, author and broadcaster Stephen Fry and Radio 1 DJ Kissy Sell Out go head-to-head on whether classical music is only a reserve of the older generation.
The Sentencing Council for England and Wales is consulting on how long burglars should spend in prison. The council's chairman, Lord Justice Leveson, and burglary victim Gurmit Sidhu, discuss the need to make changes.
US Attorney General Eric Holder tells presenter Evan Davis about the legality of the killing of Osama Bin Laden and the continuing detention of terror suspects at Guantanamo Bay.
A deal is finally on the table to end the long-running dispute between British Airways executives and cabin crew. Dr Alf Crossman, lecturer in industrial relations at Surrey University, and one of a number of academics who wrote to the Guardian last year criticising British Airways, comment on the row. ...
Is performance ever really related to talent? Times writer columnist Matthew Syed, who has written a book called Bounce: The Myth of Talent and the Power of Practice, and Professor Peter Saunders of the think tank Civitas and the author of Social Mobility Myths, debate the myths which keep our society ticking.
Police are to be given new powers to fine careless drivers on the spot, rather than taking them to court, as part of a government strategy to make Britain's roads safer. Transport Secretary Philip Hammond, sets out the measures.
The Law Commission is proposing changes to the way in which elderly people are cared for in England and Wales, after a report into the current system revealed major inefficiencies. Sanchia Berg reports on the complicated nature of most cases. Frances Patterson QC, public law commissioner at the Law Commission, ...
There are big changes coming at HSBC Bank. Peter Thal Larsen, assistant editor of Reuters' Breakingviews.com, looks at how the bank weathered the financial crisis and what it must do to meet shareholders' concerns. And Ronnie Fox, employment law specialist at Fox Lawyers in London, considers government ...
Politicians have never been popular, but a new book called In Defence Of Politicians: In Spite Of Themselves sets out to persuade us to give them a bit of slack. The author, Peter Riddell, a senior fellow at the Institute for Government, and Quentin Letts, sketch writer for the Daily Mail, debate whether ...
Universities in England may be permitted to make extra places available for wealthy British students, under government proposals. They would be charged as much as those from outside the European Union. Universities minister David Willetts considers the pros and cons.
Max Mosley, the formula one boss who was secretly filmed in a sado-masochistic orgy, will today hear from the European Court of Human Rights about whether he has won his attempt to change the law on privacy. Mr Mosley and Jo Glanville, the editor of the pressure group Index on Censorship, debate how ...
Back-to-back bank holidays and warm weather have boosted sales on the high street. Bryan Roberts, director of retail insight at Kantar Retail, explains the turnaround. And chief executive of the CFA Society of the UK, Will Goodhart, previews the "Davos of the investment industry."
Scottish First Minister, Alex Salmond, who won a landslide victory in the parliamentary elections last week, says Scots are now ready to vote for independence, and has promised to hold a referendum. Tim Luckhurst, professor of journalism at Kent University, and Joan McAlpine of the Scottish National ...
Today correspondent Tom Feilden, has been given unprecedented access to Britain's most notorious high-security hospital. He reports on the "fresh beginnings" available at Broadmoor.
Nick Clegg has threatened to derail the government's proposed Health Service bill in parliament if the Liberal Democrats do not see "substantial, significant changes to the legislation." Political editor Nick Robinson looks at the fallout of such a block. Mr Clegg's chief parliamentary and political ...
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