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Best of Today: Episodes

The government has said that that university fees will be allowed to rise towards the new maximum of £9000 only if they agree to widen access in return. But will this actually happen? The Office of Fair Access sets out today the guidelines for universities in England to help widen access, its director, ...
Tom McPhail, head of Pensions research at Hargreaves Lansdown, discusses how to ensure women who go on maternity leave do not lose out on the scheme. Michelle Fleury reports from New York on the largest insider trading case ever seen in the US. Simon Brazier reflects on the Markets. And, David Frost ...
Last week on the Today programme, Margaret Atwood suggested that TV dinners were a thing of the past. The Guardian columnist Zoe Williams and Jean Seaton, professor of media history at Westminster University, debate her claim and consider whether it is the PC dinner that has now encroached on our table time.
British scientists have developed a highly-advanced computer programme that can pinpoint the very early stages of Alzheimer's in a matter of hours rather than months. John Wright, who has Alzheimer's, tells his story and professor of old age psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Simon Lovestone, ...
Senior Liberal Democrats are urging the government to give away shares in RBS and Lloyds to the general public. The co-chair of the Lib Dem backbench committee for Treasury matters, Stephen Williams, explains their position. And John Cridland, director general of the CBI, outlines the group's priorities ...
London's West End has a new star of the four-legged variety. Toto in the Wizard of Oz the reviews from his fellow actors this week. Nicola Stanbridge went backstage to uncover what kind of puppy-wrangling skills make a star.
Sir Howard Davies has resigned amidst criticism that the LSE was too close to Saif Gaddafi. Sir Davies said he "jumped" rather than he was "pushed". Edwina Currie, former MP and minister for health who resigned over the salmonella controversy in 1988 and Times columnist, Jim White discuss if there is ...
The director of the LSE has resigned over its ties to Libya, raising questions about institutions that rely on public money in these tough times. The BBC's Will Gompertz examines the dilemma facing arts organisations who are offered sponsorship deals from foreign governments or big business and a former ...
Technology has transformed the publishing world with the widespread use of the Amazon, Kindle and the iPad. Ahead of World Book Night, author Margaret Atwood discusses her worries about the negative impact on authors with increased use of technology in publishing and digitalisation of books.
The inquest into the 7/7 bombings has come to an end, having heard evidence of horrific injuries and heroic acts. Tim Coulson, who gave evidence at the inquest, describes the moment he witnessed the explosion at Edgware station.
The director of the London School of Economics (LSE) has resigned after the university came under intense criticism over the LSE's decision to accept donations from a charitable foundation controlled by the Gadaffi regime. Sir Howard Davies gives his first interview since the announcement.
The so-called tourism deficit runs at almost £20 billion, according to one leisure industry estimate, and is widening every year. Nick Varney, CEO of Merlin Entertainments Group discusses the government strategy to get more visitors into the country. Carsten Breski, senior economist at ING Bank in Brussels ...
Official reports on Britain's UFOs have been released by the National Archives. UFO consultant to the National Archives Dr David Clarke discusses what the files reveal.
Egypt is experiencing the aftermath of its revolution. With the president gone and high expectations following his departure, Alastair Leithhead reports on the state of Egypt now.
A review of vocational education has recommended big changes, including the study of core academic subjects for children until the age of 16. Former education secretary Lord Baker and Kevin Courtney, deputy general secretary of the NUT, debate the best way to improve vocational education in England.
Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation has received government approval for its controversial takeover of BSkyB. The green light follows News Corp's offer to spin-off Sky News as an independent company. Former Sky executives David Elstein and Andrew Neil analyse the deal.
Teresa Perchard, director of Policy at the Citizens Advice Bureau says that fraudsters are cold calling people in financial trouble. Justin Urqhart-Stewart from 7 Investment Management reflects on the markets. Ken Mulkearn, editor of IDS Pay Report, discusses pay deals. And Andrew Lo, Professor of Finance ...
The Metropolitan Police are going to try to be more polite to demonstrators. When they "kettle" protesters in one area, they will provide water and portable toilets. Assistant Commissioner Lynne Owens and Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, discuss the move.
Afghan president Hamid Karzai has opened a British Museum exhibition featuring more than 200 archaeological treasures on loan from the National Museum of Afghanistan. The priceless artefacts had been feared lost or stolen, but were preserved by a few meticulous Afghans. Presenter Sarah Montague went ...
Pro-Gaddafi forces in Libya have taken control of the town of al Brayqa from opposition forces and are launching an attack on north eastern town of Ajdabiya. World affairs editor John Simpson reports from the town and Lord Ashdown explains his views on the imposition of a no-fly zone over the country.
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