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Best of Today: Episodes

A controversial website which allows children to post messages anonymously online, which campaigners say leads to "vicious" cyber-bullying, still has over 200 UK schools and colleges listed on it despite the website saying it would ban everyone under 18-years-old.

Today's Tom Bateman reports.
At least three people have been killed on the streets of Cairo as violence erupts following days of peaceful protest. Jon Leyne reports on the retired general who says the army have turned against President Mubarak. The BBC's Kevin Connolly reports from Tahrir Square. And US Under Secretary of State ...
The UK's biggest drug maker, GlaxoSmithKline, is expected to report a loss later. PWC's Andrew Packman analyses events in the pharmaceutical industry. Professor of Business at the University of Maryland School Peter Morici talks "stagflation" and James Bevan of CCLA Investment Management reflects on the markets
Can food succeed where international diplomacy has failed? Jonny Dymond reports from a restaurant in Pittsburgh serving food for thought from hostile countries.
Northern Queensland is bracing itself for what is being described as the most powerful storm ever to hit the Australian state. Dr Simon Smith, a doctor working in Cairns, describes his fears as the cyclone approaches.
The announcement by president of Egypt Hosni Mubarak that he will not stand for re-election in September has been met with hostility by the crowds of protestors still on the streets. The BBC's Kevin Connolly has been getting reaction from Tahrir Square in Cairo. And newly appointed Finance Minister Dr ...
With EMI being taken over by Citigroup, PWC's Peter Spratt and Chris Cooke from the music news website, CMU Daily look at what is next for the music giant. We return to European Commission's consultation on reform of the financial services with analysis from MEP for Wales Dr. Kay Swinburne and Stuart ...
There are some remarkable new pictures of a tribe of Indians in the Brazilian rainforest.
The tribe has never been in contact with other people before and the pictures are taken from the air because Brazil's Indian Affairs department is hoping to keep it that way.
You get a sense of the way they live ...
Crowds are assembling in the centre of the Egyptian capital, Cairo, amid calls by protest leaders for a million people to rally in support of demands for the removal of President Mubarak.
Many Egyptians believe that Mr Mubarak's position has been fatally weakened after a declaration by the army last ...
The British Heart Foundation is spending 50 million pounds on stem cell research in the hope that one day it will be as easy to recover from a heart attack as it is to repair a broken bone.
The "Holy Grail" would be a pill, or simple injection, that would stimulate the body to heal itself. That may still ...
In business, will BP announce it's first dividend since the Gulf of Mexico oil spill last year? Oil and gas analyst at S&P; Equity Research Christine Tiscareno discusses. Jean Paul Pigat of Business Monitor International examines the effect of the unrest in Egypt on the country's stock market and credit ...
British composer John Barry, who won five Oscars and four Grammys for his film scores, has died at the age of 77.
Film composer David Arnold remembers the man who inspired him.
Police in England and Wales are to be given new powers from today to deal with gangs. "Gangbos" will allow police to ban someone from meeting groups of other people, going into rival gang areas or wearing clothes that are associated with a certain group.
Is it a good use of the law or a heavy handed ...
The battle over coalition plans to lease or sell off England's forests is intensifying.
Not only has the Archbishop of Canterbury and actor Dame Judi Dench urged the government to change it's mind but over the weekend protesters marched through Cumbria to also voice their anger.
Caroline Spelman, the ...
The new head of the CBI - John Cridland - takes over today. He speaks to Adam Shaw. Jonathan Herbst - a Partner at the law firm Norton Rose - analyses proposed reforms for tighter regulatations of the financial markets. And Howard Wheeldon reflects on the markets.
Following the sexism scandal in the football world which saw the departure of Sky sports presenters Andy Gray and Richard Keys, we discuss whether the scandal was a sign that free speech must be increasingly censored in order not to offend or whether we've really moved out of the dark ages at all.

Top ...
The phone hacking saga has picked up interest in the United States. After all, it was the New York Times that spent months investigating practices at the News of the World - owned by Rupert Murdoch's News International. Former editor of the Sunday Times and pioneer of investigative journalism Sir Harold ...
Protestors were still defying the curfew in Cairo last night and there have been violent exchanges between crowds in the streets. President Mubarak promised reforms in response to the protests which have shaken his regime. He has said he'll appoint a new government today, and has promised social and ...
Members of the most successful bands have had a private school education, according to a music magazine. Today reporter Tom Bateman investigates whether pop has become posh.
Egypt is experiencing the largest political unrest since President Mubarak came into power over 30 years ago. Jeremy Bowen is in Cairo and reports on the latest events, and Middle East Peace Envoy Tony Blair speaks to Justin Webb about what he thinks Egypt's president should do.
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